CPC Plant Profile: Holly-leaf Fern
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Plant Profile

Holly-leaf Fern (Lomariopsis kunzeana)

Lomariopsis kunzeana in a Miami-Dade County preserve. Photo Credit: J. Possley
Description
  • Global Rank: G3 - Vulnerable
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Dryopteridaceae
  • State: FL
  • Nature Serve ID: 130813
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 12/07/2021

Stem long-creeping, scaly. Leaves dark green, 10-60 cm long, the petiole 3-12 cm long, grooved on the upper side, narrowly winged, scaly at the base and pubescent, the blade oblanceolate, 9-32 cm long, 2-6 cm wide, the pinnae few to many, the terminal pinna like the lateral ones, the larger ones 1-3.5 cm long, 0.5-1.5 cm wide, pale green below, dark green and shining above, short stalked, the margin irregularly dentate, the upper surface glabrous, the lower surface sparsely to moderately pubescent, the veins simple or 1-forked, extending into the teeth, the fertile pinnae terminal, linear, deciduous, the rachis narrowly and uniformly winged throughout, not scaly but with trichomes. Sori acrostichoid. (Modified from FNAI 1993 and Wunderlin and Hansen 2000)

Participating Institutions
Updates
  • 10/10/2020
  • Genetic Research

University of Florida PhD candidate Jerald Pinson is studying the habitat requirements and genetics of L. kunzeana in Florida.

  • 10/10/2020
  • Cryo

Spores are cryogenically stored at CREW

  • 10/10/2020
  • Living Collection

Selby Gardens has grown the largest, most healthy plants.

  • 10/10/2020
  • Living Collection

Marie Selby Botanic Gardens, CREW (Cincinnati Zoo), and Fairchild all have ex situ material from Florida germplasm

J. Possley
  • 02/27/2018

Marie Selby Botanic Gardens, CREW (Cincinnati Zoo), and Fairchild all have ex situ material from Florida germplasm; Selby Gardens has grown the largest, most healthy plants. Spores are cryogenically stored at CREW.

J. Possley
  • 02/27/2018

University of Florida PhD candidate Jerald Pinson is studying the habitat requirements and genetics of L. kunzeana in Florida.

J. Possley
  • 02/27/2018

The majority of South Florida's L. kunzena germplasm exists as gametophytes or as very small sporophytes.  The number of large sporophytes is certainly not increasing, per Fairchild monitoring data (2005 - present), though gametophyte population size may be stable.

J. Possley
  • 02/27/2018

Habitat loss, stochastic events due to very small population size (tree falls, storms).  Non-native invasive pest plants.  Climate change, especially as related to increasing frequency of hurricanes.

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Quite rare in Florida, and also known from Puerto Rico. Lellinger states that it is also found in Greater Antilles. Restrictive habitat (wet hammocks and sinkholes) suggests that plant is not widespread.

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Nomenclature
Taxon Lomariopsis kunzeana
Authority (Presl ex Underwood) Holttum
Family Dryopteridaceae
CPC Number 13565
ITIS 17589
USDA LOKU
Common Names CLIMBING HOLLY-FERN | HOLLY VINE FERN | hollyleaf fringed fern
Associated Scientific Names Stenochlaena kunzeana | Lomariopsis kunzeana
Distribution Florida: Miami-Dade County.
World: Florida, Cuba, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico
(http://regionalconservation.org/ircs/database/plants/PlantPage.asp?TXCODE=Lomakunz)
State Rank
State State Rank
Florida S1
Habitat

Habitat for L. kunzeana in Florida is rockland hammock solution holes, where the substrate is oolitic limestone and elevation is low.  The species is typically only found beneath closed canopy in deep, narrow holes that maintain highest humidity.  In Puerto Rico, habitat is similar, though elevations may be higher and the species isn't restricted to the deepest, most narrow holes.   

Ecological Relationships

Almost always associated with native mosses, liverworts, and other native ferns. 

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID

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