Fellowships

Catherine H. Beattie Fellowship

Each year, The Garden Club of America (GCA) and the CPC together award the Catherine H. Beattie Fellowship to graduate students in biology, horticulture, or a related field. The purpose of the award is “to promote conservation of rare and endangered flora in the United States, with preference given to students whose projects focus on the endangered flora of the Carolinas and southeastern United States.” The fellowship was established to honor Catherine H. Beattie who served as a director and board member of the GCA and served as president from 1981 to 1983. The first fellowship was given by the Fullerton Foundation in 1983.

Provisions: Provides one annual research grant of up to $4,500, regarded as compensation for work at a botanical garden by the student, who jointly serves the program of the Center for Plant Conservation and his/her curricular studies.

Eligibility: Open to graduate students in biology, botany, horticulture, or a related field. Preference is given to students whose projects focus on the endangered flora of the Carolinas and southeastern United States.

To apply: Please submit a project narrative detailing proposed research. Items to submit:

  • one page cover letter
  • two page (maximum) project narrative
  • one page project budget and timeline
  • curriculum vitae
  • letter of recommendation from major advisor or equivalent

Applications format: Items should be compiled in a single pdf document with items in the order listed above. Name the file “2021_Beattie_Fellowship_Application_LastName_FirstInitital.pdf” (e.g., 2021_Beattie_Fellowship_Application_Smith_J.pdf).

Deadline and email instructions: Applications should be completed by January 31, 2021 and emailed to info@saveplants.org with “2021 Beattie Fellowship Application” in the subject line.

Selection: Selection is by a committee appointed by the Center for Plant Conservation and is approved by the GCA Scholarship Committee. Applicants will be notified by mid-February.

Our 2020 Beattie Fellows

Mike Kunz monitoring Astragalus michauxii at Fort Bragg
Photo: North Carolina Botanical Garden conservationist, Mike Kunz, monitoring Astragalus michauxii on Fort Bragg. Photo credit: Courtesy of North Carolina Botanical Garden.

Michael Kunz, North Carolina Botanic Garden

Project: “Reproductive Ecology of Sandhills Milkvetch: Data to Model a Species’ Trajectory” Read More in our Newsletter Feature.

Michelle DePrenger setting up a vegetation monitoring quadrat.

Michelle DePrenger-Levin, Denver Botanic Gardens

Project: “Seed collections & Lifespans: How Much Can a Population Give? Revisiting the 10% Rule.” Read More in our Newsletter Feature.