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National Collection 2018-01-13T00:40:57+00:00
Rare Plant

The Center for Plant Conservation maintains a collection of more than 1,400 of America’s most imperilled native plants through its network of world class botanical gardens. Our 43 participating institutions safeguard endangered plant material in “ex situ” botanical collections including seed banks, nurseries, and garden displays. An important conservation resource, the National Collection serves as an emergency backup in case a species becomes extinct or no longer reproduces in the wild. To communicate this important work, the Center and its network of conservation experts actively update web profiles for all National Collection species, which serve as a historical record of conservation actions taken to save these rare plants. Search the National Collection and view the plant profiles to learn more about these beautiful, imperiled rare plants and the gardens that conserve them.

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Recent Conservation Updates!

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2/9/2018

Rhododendron vaseyi

The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
Contributor
: Kathryn Richardson
Institution: The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University

 

Management of Rhododendron vaseyi

The Arboretum manages the Rhododenron vaseyi collection by: practicing world class horticulture, acquiring and maintaining detailed plant records collecting herbarium specimens, harvesting and drying leaves for DNA extraction, capturing digital images. An important part of our mission is to provide access to the living collections (germplasm and related information) to researchers around the world. We both welcome scholars to visit and conduct research onsite at the Arnold Arboretum as well as collaborate globally collecting and shipping samples around the world.
 
Each Living Collections department plays an important role in managing the collection:
 
Horticulture Staff
  • Responsibilities include planting and transplanting plants from the nursery to the grounds, turf care, monitoring for insects and diseases, applying pesticides and biological controls, pruning, removing dead or declining trees, chipping brush, watering, fertilizing, applying soil amendments, removing volunteer plants and invasives, rejuvenating planting beds, mulching, removing litter, plowing snow, and maintaining equipment.
  • The Arboretum’s Landscape Management Plan divides the Arboretum into 71 zones based on location, environmental characteristics, and collections. Each horticulturist is responsible for a set of zones, allowing them to become experts on their particular zones and improve the quality of the care they provide. High value collections, such as Rhododendron vaseyi, are highlighted within each zone.
  • Maintains the Rhododendron vaseyi collection as individual specimens.
Curatorial Staff
  • Perform field checks in accordance with the Plant Inventory and Operations Manual [pdf]. This includes databasing health and performance observations for the entire collection, identity verification, label need assessment, and mapping (GIS).
  • Deposit herbarium specimens (vegetative, flower and fruit) for each accession in the living collections to the Herbarium of Cultivated Plants. Management and development of the collection is guided by the Cultivated Herbarium Collections Policy [pdf].
  • Provide access to the living collections for research and educational purposes. This includes access to plant material, sharing of germplasm, access to the landscape for frequent observations and experiments, and access to plant records (historic and present).
  • Acquire germplasm for the permanent collections in accordance with the Living Collections Policy [link].
Dana Greenhouse Production Staff
  • Produces the next generation of accessions destined for the permanent collections, as well as ensures the long-term survival of existing lineages through repropagation techniques, including cuttings and grafting.
  • Shares propagules with sister institutions and distributes plant material for research purposes.
2/9/2018

Rhododendron vaseyi

The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
Contributor
: Kathryn Richardson
Institution: The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University

 

Research about Rhododendron vaseyi

In 2016, Alexander Susko led a project, Targets of Selection and Environmental Association in Rhododendron sect. Pentanthera, studying genetic variation that has been selected upon in naturally occurring Rhododendron sect. Pentanthera species and populations. This project includes two research objectives for ascertaining adaptive genetic variation in a group of woody species:
 
  1. Identify genetic targets of selection using transcriptome-wide polymorphism data across North American deciduous azalea species
 
  1. Associate transcriptome-wide polymorphism data that are unique to North American deciduous azalea species or groups of species with environmental factors.
 
http://arnoldia.arboretum.harvard.edu/pdf/articles/2016-74-2-towards-broader-adaptability-of-north-american-deciduous-azaleas.pdf
 
2/9/2018

Rhododendron vaseyi

The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
Contributor
: Kathryn Richardson
Institution: The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University

 

Research about Rhododendron vaseyi

In 2015, Daniel Sullivan began his project, Establishing a collection of dried emerging leaf tissue as a resource for molecular studies of the living collections at the Arnold Arboretum, to establish a resource for future molecular studies. This project enhances the utility of its collections by creating a resource for current and future molecular studies.
 
  1. Appropriate accessions will be identified and flagged, and leaf tissue will be collected in the spring as the leaves are just emerging from the buds.
 
  1. Collected tissue will be dried in small packets over silica gel, five packets per accession, with appropriate information on each packet (Genus & species; accession number, date collected; tissue type; collector).
2/9/2018

Rhododendron vaseyi

The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
Contributor
: Kathryn Richardson
Institution: The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University

 

Research about Rhododendron vaseyi

In 2012, Dov Sax, Jesse Bellemare, and Liz Ryan led a project, Using native, naturalized and horticultural ranges to characterize the realized, fundamental and tolerance niches, to characterize differences among the realized, fundamental and tolerance niche by comparing the climate conditions that species encounter in their native, naturalized and horticultural ranges. This project has three main components.
 
  1. Build species distribution models (SDMs) using climate records from county-level occurrences for over 600 native species that are naturalized in New England and California. We will contrast these native-based SDMs against conditions experienced in their naturalized ranges to estimate the frequency and magnitude of differences between realized and fundamental niches.
 
  1. Build a database of US-native plants sold at nurseries in mid-Atlantic and New England states. This will allow us to examine tolerance for conditions beyond those experienced in species realized distributions.
 
  1. Measure frost damage, growth and reproduction of US-natives grown beyond their native distributions in botanical gardens.
2/9/2018

Rhododendron vaseyi

The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
Contributor
: Kathryn Richardson
Institution: The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University

 

Ex-situ collections of Rhododendron vaseyi

As part of its commitment to the Center for Plant Conservation (CPC), the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University maintains and develops its collection of Rhododendron vaseyi.  Our primary goal is to preserve the highest level of intraspecific diversity as is practicable and provide access to researchers, educators, and the general public.
 
In 2018, our Rhododendron vaseyi collection includes: 26 accessions representing 26 distinct lineages, 4 plants gr 4000 owing in our nursery, and 41 plants growing outdoors in the living collections. Each plant within an accession is maintained individually, separated by provenance, and their placement in the landscape (10 distinct locations within the 281 acre landscape) ensures individual populations/genetics remain separate.
 
2/7/2018

Trichomanes punctatum ssp. floridanum

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden
Contributor

Institution: Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

 

Management of Trichomanes punctatum ssp. floridanum

There is little to no material currently available for outplanting. Fairchild, CREW, and Marie Selby Botanical Gardens have all grown material propagated from cuttings collected by Fairchild from CASH in 2005. In all cases, agencies reported that the taxon is difficult to grow, and collections dwindled from poor health. At Fairchild, we maintained fewer than 10 colonies in small pots in terraria, but they were very susceptible to mold and fungus, did not appear to produce any new growth, never sporulated, and leaves took on a very linear form that looks very different from wild plants.   

Should healthy material become available, outplanting at extant sites in Dade (CASH, HBH, FUH, MSH) would promote conservation of this taxon, and plantings in additional habitat within the species’ historic range could also include CASR, CDE, BSP, HRD, and possibly other Miami-Dade County preserves.
2/7/2018

Trichomanes punctatum ssp. floridanum

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden
Contributor

Institution: Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

 

Conservation actions needed to save Trichomanes punctatum ssp. floridanum

It is important that Fairchild continue to annual monitoring of all Miami-Dade populations for health and sporolation.  It is also essential that the Institute for Regional Conservation take the same measures with populations in Sumter County.

The development of collection methods and the identification and photography of gametophytes in the wild  by Fairchild, IRC, and others is another needed action.

 Fairchild, and possibly others must determine whether this taxon is still present in the remnants of the former Cox hammock, obtain permissions to collect cutting and spores (ff available) for ex situ conservation.
2/7/2018

Trichomanes punctatum ssp. floridanum

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden
Contributor

Institution: Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

 

Management of Trichomanes punctatum ssp. floridanum

In most cases, current management by Miami-Dade County Natural Areas Management (NAM) appears to be sufficient to maintain the population at current levels.  However, augmenting current populations and increasing groundwater and humidity in high quality hammock sites may be the only way to sustain this species in the wild.
2/7/2018

Trichomanes punctatum ssp. floridanum

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden
Contributor

Institution: Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

 

Management of Trichomanes punctatum ssp. floridanum

Actions that are currently a priority include:
  • Conducting a search for new occurrences, all potentially suitable habitats in and around Sumter County, and historically occupied areas in Miami-Dade County where this species can thrive.
  • Continued removal of exotic plants from current habitats and immediate restoration of the canopy cover (with shade cloth if needed) over existing colonies after hurricane and other damaging  events which may cause loss of canopy cover.
  • Exploring the potential benefits of watering of colonies during extended drought periods as well as investigating the feasibility of pumping water into hammock solution holes that support rare ferns in order to increase water and humidity levels.
  • Augmentation of existing occurrences and reintroduction of extirpated occurrences through outplantings, continued protection of habitats from public use, and long term monitoring of all occurrences.
  • Initiation of life history and genetics studies; information covering longevity, growth rates, recruitment rates, reproductive requirements, dispersal methods, and genetic variation is specifically needed.
  • Assessing the extent in which fungus may be a threat in the wild.
  • Promoting a higher regional water table on the Miami Rock Ridge.
  • Establishing a monitoring program at Withlacoochee State Forest.
2/7/2018

Trichomanes punctatum ssp. floridanum

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden
Contributor

Institution: Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

 

Research about Trichomanes punctatum ssp. floridanum

A genetic analysis of tissue from all known Florida populations was conducted by Colin Hughes of Florida State University in order to determine how closely related to one another they are. He compared sequences of of one particular gene locus and his preliminary results showed that the different populations are "genetically indistinguishable" at that particular locus.