CPC Plant Profile: Santa Cruz Manzanita
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Plant Profile

Santa Cruz Manzanita (Arctostaphylos andersonii)

Photo Credit: © 2010 Neal Kramer
Description
  • Global Rank: G2 - Imperiled
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Ericaceae
  • State: CA
  • Nature Serve ID: 141166
  • Date Inducted in National Collection:

Commonly known as the Santa Cruz Manzanita. Arctostaphylos andersonii is endemic to Santa Cruz Mountains where it prefers open spaces in redwood and evergreen forests. It is a woody, perennial shrub that favors lower elevations in the mountain range and grows up to 5m tall. Their stiff leaves grow facing upwards with serrated edges and throughout their blooming season (November May), A. andersonii produces clusters of downward- facing, bell-shaped blossoms that come in variations of pink and white. The blooms eventually mature into fuzzy, red-yellow fruits. A. andersonii is currently Imperiled with less than 15 known occurrences across Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and San Mateo counties and is presently threatened by ongoing human development

Participating Institutions
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Updates
  • 09/01/2020
  • Orthodox Seed Banking

Based on an September 2020 extract of the California Plant Rescue Database, University of California-Santa Cruz Arboretum & Botanic Garden holds 1 accessions of Arctostaphylos andersonii in orthodox seed collection. We are uncertain as to how many total seeds are in this collection.

  • 09/01/2020
  • Orthodox Seed Banking

Based on an September 2020 extract of the California Plant Rescue Database, California Botanic Garden holds 1 accessions of Arctostaphylos andersonii in orthodox seed collection. There are as many as 1190 seeds of this species in their collection - although some may have been used for curation testing or sent to back up.

  • 08/05/2020
  • Seed Collection

Based on an August 2020 extract of the California Plant Rescue Database, University of California-Santa Cruz Arboretum & Botanic Garden has collected 1 seed accessions of Arctostaphylos andersonii from 1 plant occurrences listed in the California Natural Diversity Database. These collections together emcompass an unknown number of maternal plants

  • 08/05/2020
  • Seed Collection

Based on an August 2020 extract of the California Plant Rescue Database, California Botanic Garden has collected 1 seed accessions of Arctostaphylos andersonii from 1 plant occurrences listed in the California Natural Diversity Database. These collections together emcompass 7 maternal plants

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Arctostaphylos andersonii
Authority Gray
Family Ericaceae
CPC Number 8544
ITIS 23472
USDA ARAN2
Common Names Santa Cruz manzanita | Heartleaf manzanita
Associated Scientific Names Arctostaphylos andersonii | Arctostaphylos andersonii var. andersonii | Arctostaphylos andersonii var. pajaroensis | Uva-ursi andersonii
Distribution There are about 15 occurrences that can be found from along the coastline of three counties (Santa Clara, San Mateo, Santa Cruz).
State Rank
State State Rank
California S2
Habitat

A. andersonii can be found in chaparral, redwood forest, and evergreen forest communities at the edge of clearings. 

Ecological Relationships

Arctostaphylos andersonii shares beneficial relationships with hummingbirds that come forage A. andersonii flowers for their nectar. A. andersonii also attracts various pollinators. 

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Reintroduction
Lead Institution State Reintroduction Type Year of First Outplanting

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