CPC Plant Profile: Hinckley's Oak
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Plant Profile

Hinckley's Oak (Quercus hinckleyi)

The small, waxy leaves of this species have spiny tips on them. Also, notice the acorn in amongst them. Photo Credit: San Antonio Botanical Garden
Description
  • Global Rank: G2 - Imperiled
  • Legal Status: Federally Threatened
  • Family: Fagaceae
  • State: MX, TX
  • Nature Serve ID: 152274
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 02/10/1987

This unique oak is an attractive evergreen shrub forms thickets about 4 feet tall where it occurs. Its grayish-green, holly-like leaves give it a smoky appearance from a distance. It is found growing in the Chihuahuan desert on dry slopes at a 4500 foot elevation (Correll and Johnston 1996). Unlike most of our rare and endangered plants in Texas, the hinckley oak is rare due mostly to changes in climatic conditions, rather than because of habitat destruction (Miller and Powell 1982). The presence of acorns in fossils from the area where Hinckley's oak occurs indicates that this plant was much more common 10,000 years ago, when the climate of western Texas was wetter. (Texas Parks and Wildlife 2002; WWF 1990)

Participating Institutions
Updates
  • 10/08/2020
  • Reproductive Research

Sharon Weyerts, from Sul Ross State University, has studied the genetic, biochemical, and reproductive biology of this species. (Weyerts 1992)

  • 10/08/2020
  • Genetic Research

Sharon Weyerts, from Sul Ross State University, has studied the genetic, biochemical, and reproductive biology of this species. (Weyerts 1992)

  • 10/08/2020
  • Propagation Research

San Antonio Botanical Garden has collected acorns from the wild and propagated them.

  • 10/08/2020
  • Seed Collection

San Antonio Botanical Garden has collected acorns from the wild and propagated them.

  • 10/08/2020
  • Living Collection

San Antonio Botanical Garden maintains and monitors plants in test plot and on the grounds.

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Two population centers in west Texas with fewer than 10 populations. Also known from Mexico.

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Expansion of a nearby highway may threaten one population. Increased grazing pressure by cattle, who cannot reach the known populations, or the introduction of goats to the grazing regimen. Goats would be able to reach and graze upon this species. P

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Approximately ten populations are known from two counties in Texas (Texas Parks and Wildlife 2002).

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

San Antonio Botanical Garden has collected acorns from the wild and propagated them. Sharon Weyerts, from Sul Ross State University, has studied the genetic, biochemical, and reproductive biology of this species. (Weyerts 1992)

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

San Antonio Botanical Garden maintains and monitors plants in test plot and on the grounds. Most of the known populations now occur in Big Bend Ranch State Park, under the management of Texas Parks and Wildlife. (Texas Parks and Wildlife 2002)

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Population biology and population ecology research needed (USFWS 1992)

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Nomenclature
Taxon Quercus hinckleyi
Authority C.H. Muller
Family Fagaceae
CPC Number 3690
ITIS 19354
USDA QUHI
Common Names Hinckley's oak | Hinckley oak
Associated Scientific Names Quercus hinckleyi
Distribution Found in western Texas in Brewster and Presidio Counties. (Texas Parks and Wildlife 2002)
State Rank
State State Rank
Mexico
Texas S1
Habitat

Found at middle elevations in the Chihuahuan Desert scrub vegetation. It is found growing on dry limestone slopes at around 1,370 meters (4,500 ft) in elevation in habitat that receives an average of 25 cm (10 inches) of rain per year. (WWF 1990)

Ecological Relationships

Unknown.

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Other
Wind Confirmed Pollinator Link

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