CPC Plant Profile: Glade Mallow
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Plant Profile

Glade Mallow (Napaea dioica)

A plant flowering in its typical habitat. Plants can grow from three to six feet tall. Photo Credit:
Description
  • Global Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • State: VT, WI, DC, IA, IL, IN, MD, MN, OH, VA
  • Nature Serve ID: 149871
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 03/14/1986

This mallow species produces attractive white flowers in June and July (NatureServe Explorer 2002) and is cultivated for ornamental purposes by a number of nurseries. After the last glaciation, N. dioica expanded its range via riparian corridors (Botany2001 website 2002). Its range has become extremely limited as its habitat is ideal for farming and so has been plowed throughout most of its historic range (NatureServe Explorer 2002). As populations have become more fragmented and isolated from each other, riparian corridors have again become increasingly important in maintaining gene flow in this population (Botany2001 website 2002).

Participating Institutions
Updates
  • 09/19/2020
  • Genetic Research

J.P. Wenger and J.C. La Duke presented a paper at the 2001 botany meeting providing genetic data (based on microsatellite markers) highlighting the importance of riparian corridors in maintaining healthy population dynamics of N. dioica by allowing gene flow between populations and providing access to new areas for expansion after the last glaciation. (Wenger and LaDuke 2001

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Endemic to the Great Lakes region, with a few scattered outlying occurrences further east (VA and MD) and a few stands elsewhere as escapes from cultivation. Apparently rare throughout its range. Occasionally locally abundant in remnants of prairie habitat.

Lindsey Parsons
  • 01/01/2010

Destruction of habitat for agriculture Flood control

Lindsey Parsons
  • 01/01/2010

unknown

Lindsey Parsons
  • 01/01/2010

J.P. Wenger and J.C. La Duke presented a paper at the 2001 botany meeting providing genetic data (based on microsatellite markers) highlighting the importance of riparian corridors in maintaining healthy population dynamics of N. dioica by allowing gene flow between populations and providing access to new areas for expansion after the last glaciation. (Wenger and LaDuke 2001)

Lindsey Parsons
  • 01/01/2010

The Illinois Department of Conservation: Natural Heritage Division began monitoring N. dioica in 1988 as part of its endangered plant monitoring system

Lindsey Parsons
  • 01/01/2010

Nearly all aspects of the life cycle of this species are unknown The potential for asexual reproduction The existence of seed banks for this species The cause of the edge affect on seed set in habitat fragments (reduced set at edges) Light requirements for sexual reproduction Optimal habitat conditions Maintenance of free-flowing streams which are thought to provide good conditions for seedling establishment Protection of riparian corridors

Lindsey Parsons
  • 01/01/2010

Controlled studies of germination requirements and seedling establishment

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Napaea dioica
Authority L.
Family Malvaceae
CPC Number 2925
ITIS 21853
USDA NADI2
Common Names glade mallow
Associated Scientific Names Napaea dioica | Napaea dioica f. dioica
Distribution District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Ohio, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Virginia (NatureServe 2001).
State Rank
State State Rank
District of Columbia SNA
Iowa S3
Illinois S3
Indiana S2
Maryland S1
Minnesota S2
Ohio S4
Virginia S1?
Vermont SNA
Wisconsin S3
Habitat

It is often found in alluvial meadows along streams and rivers or in areas of moist, rank, weedy vegetation, sometimes including shrubs (WIS 2002, NatureServe Explorer 2002).In Illinois Actinomeris alternifolia, Amorpha fruticosa, Campanula americana, Celtis occidentalis, Elymus virginicus, Eupatorium rugosum, Rudbeckia laciniata, Silphium perfoliatum are considered associate species (Swink and Wilhelm 1979). In Wisconsin associates include Silphium perfoliatum, Thalictrum dasycarpum, Aster spp., Solidago spp., and Helianthus spp (NatureServe Explorer 2002).

Ecological Relationships

Pollinators include several genera of Hymenopterans: Bombus, Lasioglossum, and Andreana; and Dipterans from the Syrphidae and Calliphoridae.

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Bees
Bumble bees Bumble bees Confirmed Pollinator Link
Sweat bees Lasioglossum Confirmed Pollinator Link
Mining bees Andrena Confirmed Pollinator Link
Solitary bees Confirmed Pollinator Link
Bumble bees Bombus fervidus Confirmed Pollinator Link
Bumble bees Bombus griseocollis Confirmed Pollinator Link
Bumble bees Bombus americanorum Confirmed Pollinator Link
Bumble bees Bombus impatiens Confirmed Pollinator Link
Mining bees Andrena Confirmed Pollinator Link
Bumble bees Bombus fervidus Confirmed Pollinator Link
Bumble bees Bombus affinis Confirmed Pollinator Link
Bumble bees Bombus griseocollis Confirmed Pollinator Link
Bumble bees Bombus americanorum Confirmed Pollinator Link
Flies
Syrphid flies Syrphid flies Floral Visitor Link
Blow flies Calliphorid flies Floral Visitor Link
Syrphid flies Hover flies Confirmed Pollinator Link
Blow flies Calliphoridae Confirmed Pollinator Link
Blow flies Calliphoridae Confirmed Pollinator Link

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