CPC Plant Profile: Trask's Island Lotus
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Plant Profile

Trask's Island Lotus (Acmispon dendroideus var. traskiae)

Description
  • Global Rank: T3 - Vulnerable
  • Legal Status: Federally Threatened
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • State: CA
  • Nature Serve ID: 160406
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 02/10/1987

Lotus dendroideus var. traskiae is a perennial bush bearing silky branches dotted with yellow or red flowers. This legume is endemic to San Clemente Island, part of the Channel Islands, California. It grows on open, grassy slopes and hillsides. The Island's long history of herbviory has severely altered native communities; currently, only 30 occurrences of this species have survived (CDFG 2002).

Participating Institutions
Updates
  • 09/01/2020
  • Orthodox Seed Banking

Based on an September 2020 extract of the California Plant Rescue Database, Santa Barbara Botanic Garden holds 1 accessions of Acmispon dendroideus var. traskiae in orthodox seed collection. We are uncertain as to how many total seeds are in this collection.

  • 09/01/2020
  • Orthodox Seed Banking

Based on an September 2020 extract of the California Plant Rescue Database, California Botanic Garden holds 5 accessions of Acmispon dendroideus var. traskiae in orthodox seed collection. There are as many as 20031 seeds of this species in their collection - although some may have been used for curation testing or sent to back up.

  • 08/05/2020
  • Seed Collection

Based on an August 2020 extract of the California Plant Rescue Database, Santa Barbara Botanic Garden has collected 1 seed accessions of Acmispon dendroideus var. traskiae from 1 plant occurrences listed in the California Natural Diversity Database. These collections together emcompass 50 maternal plants

  • 08/05/2020
  • Seed Collection

Based on an August 2020 extract of the California Plant Rescue Database, California Botanic Garden has collected 2 seed accessions of Acmispon dendroideus var. traskiae from 2 plant occurrences listed in the California Natural Diversity Database. These collections together emcompass 12 maternal plants

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Endemic to San Clemente Island, California.

  • 01/01/2010

The introduction of alien herbivores more than a century ago has had dramatic negative effects on plant community composition on all of the Channel Islands. These effects include the reduction of native plant cover, density and biomass. Intensive herbivor

  • 01/01/2010

Approximately 30 existing sites are known. (CDFG 2002)

  • 01/01/2010

Liston and colleagues (1990) found a low degree of hybridization between Lotus species on San Clemente Island. Although hybridization was not extensive, it may still pose a long-term threat (Liston et al. 1990).

  • 01/01/2010

Since the U.S. Navy has removed goats, as a part of its Feral Animal Removal Program, the general condition of native species has improved (CDFG 2002).

  • 01/01/2010

Population monitoring and continued habitat restoration as well as understanding reproductive ecology and habitat needs through various life stages will all aid in conservation efforts.

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Acmispon dendroideus var. traskiae
Authority (Eastw. ex Noddin) Brouillet
Family Fabaceae
CPC Number 2686
ITIS 820937
USDA
Common Names San Clemente Island broom | Trasks Island lotus | Trask's island broom
Associated Scientific Names Lotus dendroideus ssp. traskiae | Acmispon dendroideus var. traskiae
Distribution This species is endemic to San Clemente Island, part of the Channel Islands, California.
State Rank
State State Rank
California S3
Habitat

Lotus dendroideus var. traskiae grows on open, grassy, north facing slopes and hillsides (CDFG 2002).

Ecological Relationships

Ecological relationships are unknown.

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Bees
Sweat bees Halictidae Confirmed Pollinator Link
Bumble bees Bumble bees Confirmed Pollinator Link
Beetles
Small beetles Confirmed Pollinator Link

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