CPC Plant Profile: San Bruno Mountain Manzanita
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Plant Profile

San Bruno Mountain Manzanita (Arctostaphylos imbricata)

The beautiful rocky slopes of San Bruno Mountain are the only home of this plant. Photo Credit: Roger Raiche
Description
  • Global Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Ericaceae
  • State: CA
  • Nature Serve ID: 159465
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 04/04/1991

San Bruno Mountain manzanita is an attractive low-growing evergreen shrub with small white flowers. It is known from only five occurrences on San Bruno Mountain in San Mateo County, California. This manzanita is threatened by fungal infection, off-road vehicle activity, and possibly by alteration of fire regimes. The species occurs within the boundaries of a regional park, which falls entirely within the San Bruno Mountain Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) (Skinner 1997). San Bruno Mountain manzanita was withdrawn from consideration for listing under the federal Endangered Species Act because impacts to it are regulated by the HCP.

Participating Institutions
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Updates
  • 08/19/2020
  • Orthodox Seed Banking

Seed collection for long-term storage.

  • 08/19/2020
  • Seed Collection

Seed collection for long-term storage.

  • 08/19/2020
  • Propagation Research

Fire is required for seed germination

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Endemic to California, Arctostaphylos imbricata is known from only five occurrences on San Bruno Mountain in San Mateo County. The manzanita is threatened by fungal infection, off-road vehicle activity, and possibly by alteration of fire regimes. The species occurs within the boundaries of a regional park, which has a management plan.

Holly Forbes
  • 01/01/2010

Fungal infection Alteration of fire regimes (fire is required for seed germination) Off-road vehicle activity Development Non-native species Source: CDFG 2002

Holly Forbes
  • 01/01/2010

This species occurs as six small populations on San Bruno Mountain. Five of these are within San Mateo County Park and one is on private land. (CDFG 2002)

Holly Forbes
  • 01/01/2010

None at this time.

Holly Forbes
  • 01/01/2010

All land use on San Bruno Mountain is regulated the nation's first Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP), adopted in 1983.

Holly Forbes
  • 01/01/2010

Demographics Genetic variability among populations Ecological requirements

Holly Forbes
  • 01/01/2010

Seed collection for long-term storage.

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Arctostaphylos imbricata
Authority Eastw.
Family Ericaceae
CPC Number 223
ITIS 23493
USDA ARIM
Common Names San Bruno Mountain manzanita
Associated Scientific Names Arctostaphylos imbricata | Arctostaphylos imbricata ssp. imbricata | Arctostaphylos andersonii var. imbricata
Distribution San Bruno Mountain, San Mateo County, California. (USFWS 1997)
State Rank
State State Rank
California S1
Habitat

This species is found on shallow soils derived from Franciscan sandstone, greywacke, or shale, on outcrops in exposed areas such as open ridges within coastal scrub or manzanita scrub. (CDFG 2002)

Ecological Relationships

San Bruno Mountain manzanita does not form a burl and requires fire for seed germination, making fire suppression on the mountain a threat to its long-term survival.

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Reintroduction
Lead Institution State Reintroduction Type Year of First Outplanting

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