CPC Plant Profile: Large-flower Rushlily
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Plant Profile

Large-flower Rushlily (Hastingsia bracteosa var. bracteosa)

The flowers of the white variety of Hastingsia bracteosa. Photo Credit: Oregon NHP
Description
  • Global Rank: G2 - Imperiled
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Liliaceae
  • State: OR
  • Nature Serve ID: 152243
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 01/01/1985

This lily with long, slender leaves can be found with both purple and white flowers. White-flowered plants (Hastingsia bracteosa var. bracteosa) are found in the north of the 12-mile (20-km) range while purple-flowered plants (var. atropurpurea) are found in the south (Lang and Zika 1997). These two forms were once classified as different species, as they were thought to have very different morphological characters, were not found in the same areas, and there was no evidence of hybrids or intermediates. Recent studies have shown that they are very similar morphologically and genetically (Lang and Zika 1997). The two color forms have now been found growing together in only one moist meadow along with plants of intermediate color (purple, pink, and white all growing together), and they appear capable of crossing with each other. This one meadow forms a transition zone between white and purple forms along the narrow range of the species.

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Updates
  • 09/15/2020
  • Genetic Research

Populations of both H. bracteosa and H. atropurpurea were examined to see if major morphological differences existed. None were found. These two forms were once classified as different species, as they were thought to have very different morphological characters, were not found in the same areas, and there was no evidence of hybrids or intermediates. Recent studies have shown that they are very similar morphologically and genetically (Lang and Zika 1997). Authors propose to reduce the later to H. bracteosa var. atropurpurea. (Lang and Zika 1997).

  • 09/15/2020
  • Demographic Research

Field investigations to determine suitable habitat for H. bracteosa. Hastingsia bracteosa was associated with the open-meadow, sloping Darlingtonia bogs on serpentine formations (Becking 1982).

  • 09/15/2020
  • Reproductive Research

Identification of insect pollinators. (David Gordon, in Becking, 1982). Field investigations to determine suitable habitat for H. bracteosa. Hastingsia bracteosa was associated with the open-meadow, sloping Darlingtonia bogs on serpentine formations (Becking 1982).

  • 09/15/2020
  • Propagation Research

Germination trials at The Berry Botanic Garden showed that moist chilling is required for germination. Seeds of Hastingsia bracteosa var. bracteosa were subjected to four tests: Direct placement in either 68F (20C) or alternating 50/68F (10/20C) and 8 weeks of cold stratification followed by placement in either 68F (20C) or 50/68F (10/20C). Only seeds subjected to a period of cold stratification germinated. 100% of the seeds germinated in the 20 treatment and 70% germinated in the alternating temperature treatment (BBG file).

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Edward Guerrant, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

Severely affected by cattle grazing (Biosystems Analysis, Inc. 1981). Cattle graze the leaves as well as the flowering stalk (Becking 1982) Mining activities - Eight Dollar Mountain has mineral right deposits of laterite (Becking 1982). Water divers

Edward Guerrant, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

There are approximately 30 occurrences of H. bracteosa var. bracteosa in Oregon. They are primarily on federal land (Forest Service and BLM), with a few on private lands. Population numbers range from about 75 to as many as 20,000. There are approximately 14 occurrences of H. bracteosa var. atropurpurea, with population numbers from 50 to 5,000. All known populations of var. atropurpurea are on federal land (ONHDB 2000).

Edward Guerrant, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

Populations of both H. bracteosa and H. atropurpurea were examined to see if major morphological differences existed. None were found. Authors propose to reduce the later to H. bracteosa var. atropurpurea. (Lang and Zika 1997). Identification of insect pollinators. (David Gordon, in Becking, 1982). Field investigations to determine suitable habitat for H. bracteosa. Hastingsia bracteosa was associated with the open-meadow, sloping Darlingtonia bogs on serpentine formations (Becking 1982). Germination trials at The Berry Botanic Garden showed that moist chilling is required for germination. Seeds of Hastingsia bracteosa var. bracteosa were subjected to four tests: Direct placement in either 68F (20C) or alternating 50/68F (10/20C) and 8 weeks of cold stratification followed by placement in either 68F (20C) or 50/68F (10/20C). Only seeds subjected to a period of cold stratification germinated. 100% of the seeds germinated in the 20 treatment and 70% germinated in the alternating temperature treatment (BBG file).

Edward Guerrant, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

Darlingtonia bogs on some private land have been protected through an agreement with The Nature Conservancy (Becking 1982). A few sites of Hastingsia bracteosa var. bracteosa are on federal land designated as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC). One site of Hastingsia bracteosa var. atropurpurea is on land designated as a Research Natural Area (RNA). Formerly a candidate for Federal listing until it was removed in 1996. Hastingsia bracteosa var. bracteosa is a Species of Concern with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Listed Threatened by the State of Oregon. Hastingsia bracteosa var. atropurpurea is a Species of Concern with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and is a Candidate for listing with the State of Oregon.

Edward Guerrant, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

Complete protection of Darlingtonia bogs (Becking 1982). Discontinue all water diversion from bog sites (Becking 1982). Consider for listing if population numbers decrease (Lang and Zika 1997).

Edward Guerrant, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

Collect and store seeds from representative populations, making sure to include both white and purple forms. Determine optimum germination conditions. Develop reliable propagation and re-introduction protocols.

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Hastingsia bracteosa var. bracteosa
Authority S. Watson
Family Liliaceae
CPC Number 2146
ITIS 502876
USDA HABR5
Common Names large-flower rushlily | large-flowered rush-lily | largeflower rushlily
Associated Scientific Names Hastingsia bracteosa | Schoenolirion bracteosum | Hastingsia bracteosa var. bracteosa
Distribution A narrow 12-mi (20-km) long zone from Eight Dollar Mt. south to Woodcock Mt. in the Illinois Valley of southwest Oregon.
State Rank
State State Rank
Oregon SNR
Habitat

Bogs, moist open meadows, seeps and wetlands often overlying serpentine or peridotite rock formations. The areas are open, at low elevations (generally below 800 ft (240 m)), and may have a gentle slope of 5-30 degrees.

Ecological Relationships

The beautiful and sweet-smelling flowers pollinated by bumblebees, honeybees, wasps and possibly Hesperidae butterflies (Becking 1982). Seeds most likely remain near the parent plant after dispersal. Seeds are heavy, ruling out wind dispersal. They do not have bristles, so they cannot easily be transported long distances by adhering to animal fur, and the ripe capsules do not remain fleshy, so it is unlikely that capsules are eaten and seeds dispersed in animal scat (Becking 1982).

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Reintroduction
Lead Institution State Reintroduction Type Year of First Outplanting

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