CPC Plant Profile: Ashy Dogweed
Search / Plant Profile / Thymophylla tephroleuca
Plant Profile

Ashy Dogweed (Thymophylla tephroleuca)

This is a closeup showing the yellow flowers. Photo Credit: San Antonio Botanical Garden
Description
  • Global Rank: G2 - Imperiled
  • Legal Status: Federally Endangered
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • State: TX
  • Nature Serve ID: 155610
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 04/04/1991

Ashy dogweed is an attractive perennial wildflower. The ashy grayish-green stems and leaves of this plant give it its name. After rains, the beautiful ashy dogweed blooms bright yellow daisy-like flowers against a mound of gray-green foliage from March to May. It grows in a sandy, grassland-shrub habitat in south Texas. At the time when this plant was listed as federally endangered (1984), only one population was known to exist in the wild, but several new populations have been recently discovered. Aggressive exotic grasses, cattle grazing and trampling, and loss of habitat due to urbanization has caused this perennial herb to be listed as an endangered species. (USFWS 1988).

Participating Institutions
Updates
  • 09/30/2020
  • Propagation Research

Research done at the National Wildflowers Research Center in Austin, Texas discovered that the seed germinated best when heat stratified. (Crank 1992)

  • 09/30/2020
  • Propagation Research

The San Antonio Botanical Garden staff has found that ashy dogweed grows easily from cuttings taken in late spring to early summer

  • 09/30/2020
  • Orthodox Seed Banking

An additional seed collection is being sent to the National Seed Storage Lab.

  • 09/30/2020
  • Living Collection

The San Antonio Botanical Gardens maintains plants in test plots and in a cold frame area.

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Endemic to extreme south Texas, where fewer than 10 populations are known. Severe habitat alteration may have played a role in this species' rarity - introduced grasses, intensive grazing, brush clearing, and oil and gas development have drastically changed most of the native grassland in this area. Research is planned to determine the effect of common range management practices on this species, which seems to respond positively to certain types of soil disturbance.

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

The survival of this species is threatened by overgrazing, potentially further loss of habitat due to roadside blading and brush clearing, as well as through possible collecting and/or vandalism. (USFWS 1984)

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

6 populations are known in northern Zapata County and southern Webb Counties, Texas (Texas Parks and Wildlife 2002)

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

The San Antonio Botanical Garden staff has found that ashy dogweed grows easily from cuttings taken in late spring to early summer. Research done at the National Wildflowers Research Center in Austin, Texas discovered that the seed germinated best when heat stratified. (Crank 1992)

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

The San Antonio Botanical Gardens maintains plants in test plots and in a cold frame area. This institution was also conducting a reintroduction project in conjunction with the Texas Heritage Program. Plants were to be reintroduced into a site recently destroyed by a utility company. Unfortunately, this project was put on hold pending highway improvements. An additional seed collection is being sent to the National Seed Storage Lab.

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Seed viability tests. Additional tests on heat stratification. Seed collection from the different populations for storage at the National Seed Storage Lab.

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

See above.

MORE

Be the first to post an update!

Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Thymophylla tephroleuca
Authority (S.F. Blake) Strother
Family Asteraceae
CPC Number 1537
ITIS 196268
USDA THTE8
Common Names Ashy dogweed | Ashy prickleyleaf
Associated Scientific Names Thymophylla tephroleuca | Dyssodia tephroleuca
Distribution Found in two counties in southern Texas (Zapata and Webb county). This species was also historically known from Starr County, Texas, but hasn't been seen there for over 70 years. (Texas Parks and Wi
State Rank
State State Rank
Texas S2
Habitat

Found on fine, sandy-loam soil in open areas of grassland-shrub communities. Dominant associates include Castela, Cordia, Prosopsis, Microrhamnus, Leucophyllum, Cercidium, and Yucca. (USFWS 1984)

Ecological Relationships

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Bees
Leaf-cutting bees Megagchilidae Confirmed Pollinator Link
Beetles
Jewel beetles Buprestidae Confirmed Pollinator Link
Flies
Bee flies Bombliidae Confirmed Pollinator Link

Donate to CPC to Save this Species

Fall fundraising drive has begun! We're looking for 2,500 people to protect our planet. With you by our side, we will build a future where people live in harmony with nature. Come help and become a CPC donor today.

Donate Today