CPC Plant Profile: Anticosti Aster
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Plant Profile

Anticosti Aster (Symphyotrichum anticostense)

Photo Credit: Donald Cameron
Description
  • Global Rank: G3 - Vulnerable
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • State: ME, NB, QC
  • Nature Serve ID: 160705
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 12/07/2021

Aster anticostense, also known as Symphyotrichum anticostense or Anticosti Island aster, is a perennial member of the Sunflower family. It grows in small clumps with each stem reaching 1-2.5 feet tall. It can be distinguished from other similar looking Aster species by its long, skinny leaves and flowering head, and its unique habitat. Aster anticostense is only found on gravelly beaches of rivers and lakes with calcareous (basic) soil. It flowers from late July through September. (Labrecque and Brouillet, 1990; New England Wildflower Society, 2017; USDA and NRCS, 2017). Aster anticostense is of conservation concern because it is only found in a handful of locations in the Northeastern North America. It is listed as Threatened in Canada and as Endangered in Maine, the only US state in which it occurs. (NatureServe, 2017; USDA and NRCS, 2017).

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Symphyotrichum anticostense
Authority (Fernald) G.L. Nesom
Family Asteraceae
CPC Number 10011
ITIS 522183
USDA SYAN3
Common Names Aster d'Anticosti | Anticosti Island aster
Associated Scientific Names Symphyotrichum anticostense | Aster anticostensis | Aster gaspensis | Aster gaspensis f. gaspensis | Aster hesperius f. albiflorus | Aster hesperius var. gaspensis
Distribution
State Rank
State State Rank
Maine S1
New Brunswick S2S3
Quebec S3
Habitat

Ecological Relationships

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID

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