CPC Plant Profile: Ozark Chinquapin
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Plant Profile

Ozark Chinquapin (Castanea ozarkensis)

A closeup of the leafy Ozark chinquapin, pictured here in cultivation at the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum. Photo Credit: J. Locklear
Description
  • Global Rank: T3 - Vulnerable
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Fagaceae
  • State: AL, AR, LA, MO, OK
  • Nature Serve ID: 158033
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 03/05/1993

The glory days of the Ozark chinquapin are past. Like the famous American chestnut of the Appalachian Mountains, Ozark chinquapin was decimated by the chestnut blight that was accidentally introduced into North America in the early part of the last century. Today, survivors of the blight hang on as stumps that send up new sprouts periodically, but which never live long enough to gain the stature of a tree.

Participating Institutions
Updates
  • 10/02/2020
  • Propagation Research

Successfully propagated from seed using 3 month cold/moist stratification pretreatment (Nebraska Statewide Arboretum).

  • 10/02/2020
  • Propagation Research

Several individual Ozark chinquapin trees are in cultivation in Nebraska, outside of the historic range of this species and, apparently, outside of the natural range of chestnut blight fungus. These trees were propagated by the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum from seed collected from wild populations in the Missouri Ozarks.

  • 10/02/2020
  • Seed Collection

Several individual Ozark chinquapin trees are in cultivation in Nebraska, outside of the historic range of this species and, apparently, outside of the natural range of chestnut blight fungus. These trees were propagated by the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum from seed collected from wild populations in the Missouri Ozarks.

  • 10/02/2020
  • Living Collection

Several individual Ozark chinquapin trees are in cultivation in Nebraska, outside of the historic range of this species and, apparently, outside of the natural range of chestnut blight fungus. These trees were propagated by the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum from seed collected from wild populations in the Missouri Ozarks.

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Widespread species; varietal form restricted to narrow range largely within the Ozark Highlands, where threatened by chestnut blight.

Jim Locklear
  • 01/01/2010

Chestnut blight, a fungal disease, kills trees before they mature. The fungus (Cryphonectria parasitica, formerly Endothia parasitica) destroys the inner bark and growing tissue of the tree. New stems sprout from dead stumps and live for several years u

Jim Locklear
  • 01/01/2010

Unknown.

Jim Locklear
  • 01/01/2010

Despite ongoing research focused on American chestnut, no treatment has been found for chestnut blight. Successfully propagated from seed using 3 month cold/moist stratification pretreatment (Nebraska Statewide Arboretum).

Jim Locklear
  • 01/01/2010

Conservation and protection in the wild is problematic until a treatment is developed for chestnut blight. Several individual Ozark chinquapin trees are in cultivation in Nebraska, outside of the historic range of this species and, apparently, outside of the natural range of chestnut blight fungus. These trees were propagated by the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum from seed collected from wild populations in the Missouri Ozarks.

Jim Locklear
  • 01/01/2010

Until a treatment is developed for chestnut blight, ex situ conservation is the best hope for the survival of this species. However, chestnut seed is desiccation-sensitive and does not remain viable in long-term storage (Pence 1990). Cryopreservation of embryos is one possible storage option. The Nebraska Statewide Arboretum intends to develop an ex situ collection of living trees propagated from seed collected throughout the range of the Ozark chinquapin.

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Castanea ozarkensis
Authority Ashe
Family Fagaceae
CPC Number 799
ITIS 19456
USDA CAOZ
Common Names Ozark chestnut | Ozark chinquapin | Ozark chinkapin
Associated Scientific Names Castanea pumila var. ozarkensis | Castanea ozarkensis | Castanea alabamensis | Castanea ozarkensis var. arkansana
Distribution Centered in the Ozark Highlands of northwestern Arkansas (34 counties) and adjacent eastern Oklahoma (Adair, Cherokee, Choctaw, Delaware, Latimer, LeFlore, Mayes, McCurtain counties), and southwestern
State Rank
State State Rank
Alabama SH
Arkansas S3S4
Louisiana S1
Missouri S2
Oklahoma S2
Habitat

Uplands and cliff margins and ridges, and at the base of talus slopes on limestone, sandstone and chert, or a combination of these. Occurs in dry oak-hickory or oak-pine forests, with white oak, black oak, scarlet oak, and shortleaf pine dominating. Flowering individuals occur in edge habitats. Ironwood strongly associated in Oklahoma (Schnell et al. 1977). Elevation 500-2800 ft.

Ecological Relationships

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Other
Wind Confirmed Pollinator Link

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