CPC Plant Profile: Texas Poppy-mallow
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Plant Profile

Texas Poppy-mallow (Callirhoe scabriuscula)

Bees use these poppy-mallow flowers for nectar, pollen and shelter. In return, the plant get help with reproduction, as bees spread pollen between plants. Photo Credit: © McDonald
Description
  • Global Rank: G2 - Imperiled
  • Legal Status: Federally Endangered
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • State: TX
  • Nature Serve ID: 137437
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 06/18/1986

Texas Poppy Mallow is a perennial herb about 18 inches high with beautiful wine-purple, cup-shaped flowers. These flowers bloom from May to June, and a key source of nectar, pollen, and shelter for bees in the area. These bees help the plant reproduce by spreading pollen between plants. Each flower opens in the morning a few hours after sunrise, closing right before sunset. If a flower is lucky enough to be pollinated by a visiting bee, it will close 30 to 90 minutes later, never opening again, and well on its way to producing seed. If a flower is not pollinated, it will continue its daily opening and closing ritual for six to eight days before wilting, unpollinated. (Texas Parks and Wildlife 2002) It occurs within the Rolling Plains vegetation zone of Texas. It is limited to deep, loose sand (USFWS 1985). Seed has been collected from this member of the Winecup genus and is being propagated at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. There is difficulty in transplanting the greenhouse grown plants into test plots (Merritt, pers. comm.)

Participating Institutions
Updates
  • 09/01/2020
  • Propagation Research

Seed has been collected from this member of the Winecup genus and is being propagated at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. There is difficulty in transplanting the greenhouse grown plants into test plots (Merritt, pers. comm.) The San Antonio Botanical Garden has grown plants from seed. Seed germinates but is difficult to transplant. Cruze studied the seed bank and population dynamics of this species (Cruze 1991; Cruze and Amos 1992) [Less...]

  • 09/01/2020
  • Living Collection

Several plants were maintained in a test plot but deteriorated after several years.

  • 08/31/2020
  • Orthodox Seed Banking

Seed has been collected from this member of the Winecup genus and is being propagated at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. There is difficulty in transplanting the greenhouse grown plants into test plots (Merritt, pers. comm.) The San Antonio Botanical Garden has grown plants from seed. Seed germinates but is difficult to transplant. Cruze studied the seed bank and population dynamics of this species (Cruze 1991; Cruze and Amos 1992) [Less...]

  • 08/31/2020
  • Seed Collection

Seed has been collected from this member of the Winecup genus and is being propagated at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. There is difficulty in transplanting the greenhouse grown plants into test plots (Merritt, pers. comm.) The San Antonio Botanical Garden has grown plants from seed. Seed germinates but is difficult to transplant. Cruze studied the seed bank and population dynamics of this species (Cruze 1991; Cruze and Amos 1992)

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Known from about 10 populations in central Texas where it is restricted to a small area of deep sands. Most suitable habitat has been lost in recent years to sand mining, agriculture, improved pastures, residential and business development, and oil and gas development.

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Threats include habitat loss due to farming, pasture planting, sand mining, and urban development. Because the flowers of this species are so beautiful, it is also susceptible to flower-picking, which is detrimental to the remaining populations because i

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

There are over 10 known populations in three Texas counties, at least one of which has landowner protection. (Texas Parks and Wildlife 2002)

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

The San Antonio Botanical Garden has grown plants from seed. Seed germinates but is difficult to transplant. Cruze studied the seed bank and population dynamics of this species (Cruze 1991; Cruze and Amos 1992)

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Several plants were maintained in a test plot but deteriorated after several years.

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Growth protocol research Seed collection from wild populations

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Seed collection needed so as to send seed to the National Seed Storage Laboratory.

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Nomenclature
Taxon Callirhoe scabriuscula
Authority B.L. Robins.
Family Malvaceae
CPC Number 675
ITIS 21788
USDA CASC4
Common Names Texas poppy-mallow | Texas poppymallow
Associated Scientific Names Callirhoe scabriuscula
Distribution Coke, Mitchell, and Runnels counties in Texas (Texas Parks and Wildlife 2002)
State Rank
State State Rank
Texas S2
Habitat

Loose, deep sand along the upper Colorado River. (USFWS 1981)

Ecological Relationships

Pollinated by bees.

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Bees
Chimney bees Diadasia afflicta Confirmed Pollinator Link
Long-horned bees Melissodes intorta Confirmed Pollinator Link
Long-horned bees Melissodes tepaneca Confirmed Pollinator Link

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