CPC Plant Profile: Eastwood's Monkeyflower
Search / Plant Profile / Erythranthe eastwoodiae
Plant Profile

Eastwood's Monkeyflower (Erythranthe eastwoodiae)

Description
  • Global Rank: G3 - Vulnerable
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Phrymaceae
  • State: AZ, CO, UT
  • Nature Serve ID: 161736
  • Date Inducted in National Collection:

Mimulus eastwoodiae is a Colorado Plateau endemic, growing in special areas that make it too vulnerable to collectors and sight-seers. New plants are produced from stolons (runners) so that large areas are sometimes covered in M. eastwoodiae plants. Flowers are about an inch long, scarlet to orange/red, and short-lived. In 1911 Per Axel Rydberg discovered this lovely plant in Utah and in 1913 he named it for schoolteacher and expert botanist, Alice Eastwood.

Participating Institutions
CPC's Plant Sponsorship Program provides long term stewardship of rare plants in our National Collection. We are so grateful for all our donors who have made the Plant Sponsorship Program so successful. We are in the process of acknowledging all our wonderful plant sponsorship donors on our website. This is a work in progress and will be updated regularly.
Updates
Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Mimulus eastwoodiae is endemic to the Canyon Lands of southeastern Utah and adjacent Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Approximately 25 occurrences have been mapped, and an additional 30-40 sites have been documented in the Navajo Nation. The hanging garden communities in which this species occurs are vulnerable to any disturbance of the water supply, which can occur due to prolonged drought, global climate change, or water development projects. While this species is relatively widespread and drought-tolerant compared to other hanging garden endemics of this region, these ongoing threats to its habitat will eventually impact its persistence and are a concern. Other threats, including disturbance by livestock and humans, are considered relatively minor because many sites have low accessibility.

Rydb., Mary Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

Occurs in hanging garden communities around seeps. These communities are vulnerable to any disturbance of the water supply, which can occur due to prolonged drought, global climate change, or water development projects. Many hanging gardens in the Navajo

Rydb., Mary Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

In Colorado, approximately 8 occurrences (depending on delineation) are known from 4 counties (Montrose, Mesa, San Miguel, and Delta); nearly all of these occurrences have been visited recently (1997 or later). In Arizona, approximately 5 occurences (depending on delineation) are known from 3 counties (Apache, Navajo, and Coconino); nearly all of these occurrences have been visited recently as well (2001 or later). In Utah, 10 occurrences are believed extant in 4 counties (Garfield, Grand, Kane, and San Juan), although they have not been re-visited recently (last visited between 1952 and 1986). An additional 11 occurrences in Utah are believed historical. In the Navajo Nation, surveys of the species' hanging garden habitat have been conducted, but individual occurrences have not been mapped; so far, it has been documented in approximately 30-40 hanging gardens (D. Roth, pers. comm. 2008). The New Mexico occurrence (on Navajo Nation lands) was discovered in 2002 and is close to the Arizona border.

Rydb., Mary Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

Unknown

Rydb., Mary Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

Unknown

Rydb., Mary Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

Unknown

Rydb., Mary Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

Unknown

MORE

Be the first to post an update!

Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Erythranthe eastwoodiae
Authority (Rydb.) G.L. Nesom & N.S. Fraga
Family Phrymaceae
CPC Number 6415
ITIS
USDA
Common Names Eastwood's monkeyflower
Associated Scientific Names Mimulus eastwoodiae | Erythranthe eastwoodiae
Distribution Endemic to the Canyon Lands of southeastern Utah and adjacent Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico (Cronquist et al. 1984, Heil et al. 2002). The report of M. eastwoodiae from Nevada was based on misiden
State Rank
State State Rank
Arizona S1S2
Colorado S1S2
Utah S3
Habitat

Moist seeps and hanging garden communities in sandstone cliffs in the Canyonlands. Co-occurring species include Primula specuicola, Adiantum capillus-veneris, Aquilegia micrantha, and Epipactis gigantea.

Ecological Relationships

Not Available

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Birds
Hummingbirds Hummingbirds Confirmed Pollinator Link
Reintroduction
Lead Institution State Reintroduction Type Year of First Outplanting

Donate to CPC to Save this Species

CPC secures rare plants for future generations by coordinating on-the-ground conservation and training the next generation of plant conservation professionals. Donate today to help save rare plants from extinction.

Donate Today