Case's lady's tresses - Center For Plant Conservation
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Case's lady's tresses (Spiranthes casei)

  • Global Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Orchidaceae
  • State: ME, MI, NB, NH, NS, NY, ON, PA, QC, VT, WI
  • Nature Serve ID: 150066
  • Date Inducted in National Collection:
Description:

Where is Case's lady's tresses (Spiranthes casei) located in the wild?

Distribution:

Northeastern United States and Canada.  Endangered in Pennsylvania (Taylor et al. 2018)

States & Provinces:

Case's lady's tresses can be found in Maine, Michigan, New Brunswick, New Hampshire, New York, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Pennsylvania, Quebec, Vermont, Wisconsin

Which CPC Partners conserve Case's lady's tresses (Spiranthes casei)?

CPC's Plant Sponsorship Program provides long term stewardship of rare plants in our National Collection. We are so grateful for all our donors who have made the Plant Sponsorship Program so successful. We are in the process of acknowledging all our wonderful plant sponsorship donors on our website. This is a work in progress and will be updated regularly.

Conservation Actions

  • 10/13/2020
  • Propagation Research

The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources contacted Peter Zale after fracking destroyed a population of Spiranthes casei in the Northwestern quadrant in Pennsylvania. In November of 2015, mature seeds were harvested from two counties, air-dried for six weeks, and then subjected to three experiments. The first experiment was a simple observation of sterilization time to put seeds into tissue culture using two treatments of either 3 or 10 minutes in a 10% bleach solution. The end result was that the seeds placed in the 10 minute treatment were non-viable and completely transparent. In the second experiment seeds were plated onto three different germination media (P723, M551, and K400 available from Phytotechnology Labs). Seed germination ranged from 24 to 60% and occurred on all three media only with the 3-minute treatment. In this experiment, no significant difference was noted in relation to germination and protocorm development. The third study consisted of taking germinating seedlings and putting them into a factorial experiment using two different tissue culture media (P723 and P658) and applying three different photoperiod treatments (24-hour dark, 24-hour light, 16-hour light/8 dark) for 10 months. Seedling survival and growth occurred in all treatments but seedlings on the P723 media with the 24-hour light treatment or the 16-hour light/8 dark treatment produced plants with greater fresh weight, leaf length including more and longer roots. Conclusion of the photoperiod portion of this experiment is that light is critical for seedling development. (Taylor et al. 2018)

  • 10/13/2020
  • Tissue Culture

The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources contacted Peter Zale after fracking destroyed a population of Spiranthes casei in the Northwestern quadrant in Pennsylvania. In November of 2015, mature seeds were harvested from two counties, air-dried for six weeks, and then subjected to three experiments. The first experiment was a simple observation of sterilization time to put seeds into tissue culture using two treatments of either 3 or 10 minutes in a 10% bleach solution. The end result was that the seeds placed in the 10 minute treatment were non-viable and completely transparent. In the second experiment seeds were plated onto three different germination media (P723, M551, and K400 available from Phytotechnology Labs). Seed germination ranged from 24 to 60% and occurred on all three media only with the 3-minute treatment. In this experiment, no significant difference was noted in relation to germination and protocorm development. The third study consisted of taking germinating seedlings and putting them into a factorial experiment using two different tissue culture media (P723 and P658) and applying three different photoperiod treatments (24-hour dark, 24-hour light, 16-hour light/8 dark) for 10 months. Seedling survival and growth occurred in all treatments but seedlings on the P723 media with the 24-hour light treatment or the 16-hour light/8 dark treatment produced plants with greater fresh weight, leaf length including more and longer roots. Conclusion of the photoperiod portion of this experiment is that light is critical for seedling development. (Taylor et al. 2018)

  • 10/13/2020
  • Seed Collection

The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources contacted Peter Zale after fracking destroyed a population of Spiranthes casei in the Northwestern quadrant in Pennsylvania. In November of 2015, mature seeds were harvested from two counties, air-dried for six weeks, and then subjected to three experiments. The first experiment was a simple observation of sterilization time to put seeds into tissue culture using two treatments of either 3 or 10 minutes in a 10% bleach solution. The end result was that the seeds placed in the 10 minute treatment were non-viable and completely transparent. In the second experiment seeds were plated onto three different germination media (P723, M551, and K400 available from Phytotechnology Labs). Seed germination ranged from 24 to 60% and occurred on all three media only with the 3-minute treatment. In this experiment, no significant difference was noted in relation to germination and protocorm development. The third study consisted of taking germinating seedlings and putting them into a factorial experiment using two different tissue culture media (P723 and P658) and applying three different photoperiod treatments (24-hour dark, 24-hour light, 16-hour light/8 dark) for 10 months. Seedling survival and growth occurred in all treatments but seedlings on the P723 media with the 24-hour light treatment or the 16-hour light/8 dark treatment produced plants with greater fresh weight, leaf length including more and longer roots. Conclusion of the photoperiod portion of this experiment is that light is critical for seedling development. (Taylor et al. 2018)

Elvia Ryan
  • 07/24/2018

Upcoming greenhouse projects for Longwood Gardens include (1) Acclimatization experiments.  (2) Repatriation and restoration of seed source populations.  (3) Establishing ex-situ populations.  (4) Distribution to other gardens.  In addition, a new project is set to start to evaluate if fungus is needed in the Stage 4 TC step.  The ongoing plan is to use the Spiranthes model for research and conservation of all other species. (Taylor et al. 2018)

Elvia Ryan
  • 07/24/2018

The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources contacted Peter Zale after fracking destroyed a population of Spiranthes casei in the Northwestern quadrant in Pennsylvania.  In November of 2015, mature seeds were harvested from two counties, air-dried for six weeks, and then subjected to three experiments.  The first experiment was a simple observation of sterilization time to put seeds into tissue culture using two treatments of either 3 or 10 minutes in a 10% bleach solution. The end result was that the seeds placed in the 10 minute treatment were non-viable and completely transparent.  In the second experiment seeds were plated onto three different germination media (P723, M551, and K400 available from Phytotechnology Labs).  Seed germination ranged from 24 to 60% and occurred on all three media only with the 3-minute treatment.  In this experiment, no significant difference was noted in relation to germination and protocorm development.  The third study consisted of taking germinating seedlings and putting them into a factorial experiment using two different tissue culture media (P723 and P658) and applying three different photoperiod treatments (24-hour dark, 24-hour light, 16-hour light/8 dark) for 10 months.  Seedling survival and growth occurred in all treatments but seedlings on the P723 media with the 24-hour light treatment or the 16-hour light/8 dark treatment produced plants with greater fresh weight, leaf length including more and longer roots.  Conclusion of the photoperiod portion of this experiment is that light is critical for seedling development.  (Taylor et al. 2018)

Elvia Ryan
  • 07/22/2018

Spiranthes casei is an endangered species in the state of Pennsylvania. Fracking destroyed a population located in the Northwestern quadrant in Pennsylvania.  (Taylor et al. 2018)

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Nomenclature
Taxon Spiranthes casei
Authority Catling & Cruise
Family Orchidaceae
CPC Number 44863
ITIS 43456
USDA SPCA6
Common Names Case's lady's tresses | Case's ladies'-tresses | spiranthe de Case
Associated Scientific Names Spiranthes casei | Spiranthes casei var. casei
Distribution Northeastern United States and Canada.  Endangered in Pennsylvania (Taylor et al. 2018)
State Rank
State State Rank
Wisconsin
Michigan
Ontario
Quebec
New York
Pennsylvania
New Hampshire
Vermont
Maine
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
Ecological Relationships

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