CPC Plant Profile: Globe Gilia
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Plant Profile

Globe Gilia (Ipomopsis globularis)

Photo Credit: Alexandra Seglias
Description
  • Global Rank: G2 - Imperiled
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Polemoniaceae
  • State: CO
  • Nature Serve ID: 161335
  • Date Inducted in National Collection:

A perennial herb, 1.5 dm tall, with a strong, sweet fragrance. Produces white or pale purple flowers in a globe-like cluster surrounded by long, wooly hairs. Blooms July-early August.

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Updates
Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

The species' geographic range is limited to high elevations in the Mosquito Range and the Hoosier Ridge area of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. There are nine document occurrences, four with good or excellent viability. Motorized recreation is rapidly increasing in areas where this species grows. Mining claims exist throughout the range of Ipomopsis globularis and, although most are not currently active, they represent a potential threat to the species.

(Brand) W.A. Weber, Mary VB Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

The primary threat at this time is considered to be motorized recreation (Rondeau et al. 2011). Other potential threats are from mining, exotic species invasion, effects of small population size, collection for horticultural trade, non-motorized recreatio

(Brand) W.A. Weber, Mary VB Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

There are 9 principal occurrences documented in the Colorado Natural Heritage Program database. 5 of the 9 occurrences have not been observed in over 20 years. The USFS Conservation Assessment also documents 9 occurrences (Spackman Panjabi and Anderson 2005).

(Brand) W.A. Weber, Mary VB Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

Unknown

(Brand) W.A. Weber, Mary VB Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

Unknown

(Brand) W.A. Weber, Mary VB Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

Further species inventory work specifically targeting Ipomopsis globularis is a high research priority. Until there is a complete picture of its distribution and population size, it will not be possible to accurately assess the conservation needs and priorities for this species. While information on the life cycle of Ipomopsis globularis can be inferred to some extent from the very well-studied I. aggregata, specific research on I. globularis is needed to understand its population ecology. A more thorough investigation of its lifespan and autecology is needed. The habitat for Ipomopsis globularis has been described, but the nature of its natural habitat and natural disturbance regime is poorly understood. An explanation for the extremely limited range of I. globularis is wanting. The population trend of Ipomopsis globularis is not known and may be difficult to quantify. However, understanding the population biology of I. globularis is important for appropriate stewardship and management of this species. Rates of reproduction and establishment and the effects of environmental variation on these parameters have not been investigated in Ipomopsis globularis, making the effects of various management options difficult to assess during project planning. The role of disturbance in the autecology of Ipomopsis globularis remains poorly understood. An understanding of the specific tolerances of I. globularis to different human and natural disturbance regimes would assist with developing conservation strategies and management plans by determining the types of disturbance most likely to negatively impact it. Demographic studies are needed for Ipomopsis globularis. Demographic data may be more useful for assessing status and developing recovery efforts than for genetic information (Schemske et al. 1994). Determining the critical life history stages of I. globularis would allow managers to focus efforts on implementing management protocols that benefit those stages. A monitoring program that determines effective population sizes and investigates the growth, survival, and reproduction of individuals within populations will have considerable practical value and would help to determine the conservation status of I. globularis. Information gleaned from studies of the physiological and community ecology of Ipomopsis globularis would be valuable in the event that a population needs to be restored, and it will help to determine the biotic and abiotic factors that contribute to its survival. Understanding the plant-environment relationship for I. globularis would be insightful in understanding the coping strategies employed by this species, and it would help to model its potential distribution.

(Brand) W.A. Weber, Mary VB Goshorn
  • 01/01/2010

Seed collection and storage

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Ipomopsis globularis
Authority (Brand) W.A. Weber
Family Polemoniaceae
CPC Number 2318
ITIS 503185
USDA IPGL
Common Names Globe Gilia | Hoosier Pass ipomopsis
Associated Scientific Names Ipomopsis globularis | Gilia globularis
Distribution Endemic to Colorado; known from Lake, Park, and Summit counties. From Steve Olson (USFS Pike San Isabel) 2012: Ipomopsis globularis is known from three counties in central Colorado. All are within a
State Rank
State State Rank
Colorado S2
Habitat

A perennial herb, 1.5 dm tall, with a strong, sweet fragrance. Produces white or pale purple flowers in a globe-like cluster surrounded by long, wooly hairs. Blooms July-early August.

Ecological Relationships

The pollination ecology of the Polemoniaceae has been the topic of extensive study, particularly in the genera Ipomopsis and Gilia. Although highly specialized breeding systems are found in some members of the Polemoniaceae, I. globularis appears to be a generalist pollinated by a broad suite of insects. Ipomopsis globularis has a relatively shallow corolla tube when compared with specialists such as I. aggregata, which largely depends on hummingbirds for its pollination (Grant and Grant 1965). Plants with very little floral specialization are considered promiscuous plants because they utilize unspecialized, generalist pollinators as pollen vectors (Grant 1949, Bell 1971). Reliance on a broad suite of pollinators for pollinator services probably buffers promiscuous plants from population swings of any one pollinator (Parenti et al. 1993).

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Bees
Honey bees Apis mellifera Confirmed Pollinator Link
Sweat bees Augochlorella Confirmed Pollinator Link
Anthophorine bees Anthophora Confirmed Pollinator Link
Bumble bees Bombus Confirmed Pollinator Link
Sweat bees Dialictus Confirmed Pollinator Link
Leaf-cutting bees Megachile Confirmed Pollinator Link
Sweat bees Lasioglossum Confirmed Pollinator Link
Sweat bees Halictus rubicundus Confirmed Pollinator Link
Leaf-cutting bees Osmia ednae Confirmed Pollinator Link
Sweat bees Evylueus Confirmed Pollinator Link
Butterflies & Moths
Brush-footed butterflies Euphydryas anicia brucei Floral Visitor Link
Flies
House flies and kin Thricops villicrura Suspected Pollinator Floral Link
Other
Wood ants Formica neorufibaris gelida Suspected Pollinator Floral Link
Wood ants Formica neorufibaris gelida Suspected Pollinator Floral Link
Reintroduction
Lead Institution State Reintroduction Type Year of First Outplanting

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