CPC Plant Profile: Fryxell's Pygmy Mallow
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Plant Profile

Fryxell's Pygmy Mallow (Fryxellia pygmaea)

Description
  • Global Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • State: MX, TX
  • Nature Serve ID: 139515
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 02/21/2003

Participating Institutions
Updates
Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Collected in Texas for the first and only time in 1854 ('Texas' was the only locality information given), the species may no longer be extant in the United States. The only other known occurrence - a single population in Coahuila, Mexico that was first found in 1941 - was rediscovered in 1990. At the time of its rediscovery, it densely occupied an area about 100-150 m in diameter, but was not found outside that area. The plants were abundantly fruiting, and the seeds were shown to be viable, so it is not apparent why the species is restricted to such a small area. Fryxell and Valdes (1991) suggest that seedling establishment in the severe desert environment of central Coahuila may be a relatively rare event; this population may be an ancient clone surviving by vegetative propagation. However, it is possible that more populations or clones will be found with further searching. The Texas and Coahuila sites are 200-300 km apart, with much suitable, botanically unexplored habitat in between.

  • 01/01/2010

last seen in West Texas in 1850's, presumed extirpated new population found in Mexico

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Fryxellia pygmaea
Authority (Correll) Bates
Family Malvaceae
CPC Number 1968
ITIS 502684
USDA FRPY
Common Names Fryxell's Pygmy Mallow | small fryxell wort | small fryxellwort
Associated Scientific Names Fryxellia pygmaea | Anoda pygmaea
Distribution
State Rank
State State Rank
Mexico
Texas SH
Habitat

Ecological Relationships

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID

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