CPC Plant Profile: Maguire's Daisy
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Plant Profile

Maguire's Daisy (Erigeron maguirei)

The white aster flowers typical of Maguire's daisy can be found blooming in June and July. Photo Credit: Joyce Maschinski
Description
  • Global Rank: G2 - Imperiled
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • State: UT
  • Nature Serve ID: 155795
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 03/05/1993

Erigeron maguirei var. maguirei is no longer recognized as a true variety, as DNA analysis was not able to show any variation between the formerly recognized varieties E. maguirei var. maguirei and E. maguirei var. harrisonii (Van Buren 1993). This was supported by the recently published volume 5 of the Intermountain Flora (Cronquist et al. 1994). Because of these findings, Erigeron maguirei var. maguirei was sunk into protection under the species Erigeron maguirei, which was then downlisted from federally endangered to federally threatened in 1996, with no recognized infraspecific varieties. (USFWS 1996) Maguire daisy is a small perennial, herbaceous plant with spatulate-shaped hairy leaves and dime-sized pinkish white daisy flowers. Bits of sand commonly cling to the hairs of the leaves and stems.

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Updates
  • 10/10/2020
  • Propagation Research

In 1991, the Arboretum at Flagstaff conducted germination trials and found that seeds could germinate equally well under a variety of conditions. Those tested were 1 and 2 month stratification and direct mist. Germination rates were 30%, 24%, and 26% respectively.

  • 10/10/2020
  • Genetic Research

Van Buren (1993) determined that variety maguirei and var. harrisonii were synonymous through genetic studies

Joyce Maschinski, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

Threats include (as stated by the USFWS (1996)): Loss of habitat and genetic viability Off-road vehicles Trampling by humans and livestock Mineral and energy exploration and development

Joyce Maschinski, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

At the time of reclassification in 1996, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stated that there were around 3,000 individuals of Erigeron maguirei documented at 12 different sites. These 12 sites are reproductively isolated, and so are separate populations. (USFWS 1996)

Joyce Maschinski, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

Van Buren (1993) determined that variety maguirei and var. harrisonii were synonymous through genetic studies. In 1991, the Arboretum at Flagstaff conducted germination trials and found that seeds could germinate equally well under a variety of conditions. Those tested were 1 and 2 month stratification and direct mist. Germination rates were 30%, 24%, and 26% respectively.

Joyce Maschinski, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

None known.

Joyce Maschinski, Ph.D.
  • 01/01/2010

There is need for research on biological and ecological factors controlling the viability of the Maguire daisy, minimum population viability studies, and horticultural requirements.

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Erigeron maguirei
Authority Cronquist
Family Asteraceae
CPC Number 1654
ITIS 35898
USDA ERMA8
Common Names Maguire daisy | Maguire's fleabane
Associated Scientific Names Erigeron maguirei var. maguirei | Erigeron maguirei | Erigeron maguirei var. harrisonii
Distribution Found in three counties in Utah (Emery, Garfield and Wayne) (State of Utah Natural Resources 2002).
State Rank
State State Rank
Utah S2
Habitat

This species is found growing in slickrock crevices, on ledges, and in the bottom of canyon washes in the Navajo Sandstone formation at elevations of 1600 to 2500 meters. (State of Utah Natural Resources 2002)

Ecological Relationships

Unknown.

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Reintroduction
Lead Institution State Reintroduction Type Year of First Outplanting

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