CPC Plant Profile: Gentry's Indigobush
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Plant Profile

Gentry's Indigobush (Dalea tentaculoides)

Description
  • Global Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled
  • Legal Status: N/A
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • State: AZ
  • Nature Serve ID: 142353
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 03/05/1993

Dalea tentaculoides is a shrub with numerous stems. The compound leaves have 9-17 leaflets, and the small, pea-like flowers are rose-purple in color. The plant flowers in April, through June, and sometimes again in September-October. It is very similar in appearance to at least three other Daleas growing in the same canyon.

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Updates
  • 09/08/2020
  • Orthodox Seed Banking

Sixty seeds of Dalea tentaculoides are currently held in the seed vault at Desert Botanical Garden. Additional seeds need to be collected before baseline germination tests can be conducted. The resulting plants need to be grown to maturity, producing flowering material that can be used to make herbarium specimens for further taxonomic evaluation of the validity of the species. Additionally, seed and herbarium specimen collections of all the Daleas growing with D. tentaculoides should be made for the same reason. Desert Botanical Garden will retain plants resulting from germination tests for production of seed in cultivation.

  • 09/08/2020
  • Seed Collection

Sixty seeds of Dalea tentaculoides are currently held in the seed vault at Desert Botanical Garden. Additional seeds need to be collected before baseline germination tests can be conducted. The resulting plants need to be grown to maturity, producing flowering material that can be used to make herbarium specimens for further taxonomic evaluation of the validity of the species. Additionally, seed and herbarium specimen collections of all the Daleas growing with D. tentaculoides should be made for the same reason. Desert Botanical Garden will retain plants resulting from germination tests for production of seed in cultivation.

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

The historic range of this species includes the Coyote and Baboquivari mountains in Pima County, Arizona. There is one known population in Arizona, located in the Pajarito Mountains of Santa Cruz County, and several sites in Sonora, Mexico. Threats include seasonal flooding, consumption by livestock, watershed degradation due to overgrazing, and trampling by recreationists and livestock

Kathleen C. Rice
  • 01/01/2010

Major threats include seasonal flooding, limited range, habitat degradation due to grazing by livestock, consumption by livestock, and trampling by people and livestock (Toolin 1982, 1986, Gori et al. 1992).

Kathleen C. Rice
  • 01/01/2010

Known to occur in only a few sites, one of which is Sycamore Canyon, Arizona, near Nogales. Less than 12 individuals were observed during the last site visit, but up to 3 dozen have been reportedly seen in that canyon (USFWS 1998).

Kathleen C. Rice
  • 01/01/2010

Sixty seeds of Dalea tentaculoides are currently held in the seed vault at Desert Botanical Garden. Additional seeds need to be collected before baseline germination tests can be conducted. The resulting plants need to be grown to maturity, producing flowering material that can be used to make herbarium specimens for further taxonomic evaluation of the validity of the species. Additionally, seed and herbarium specimen collections of all the Daleas growing with D. tentaculoides should be made for the same reason. Desert Botanical Garden will retain plants resulting from germination tests for production of seed in cultivation.

Kathleen C. Rice
  • 01/01/2010

Plants are being annually surveyed by Nature Conservancy staff (Falk and Warren 1994).

Kathleen C. Rice
  • 01/01/2010

Exploration for other populations in nearby canyons is needed. A quantitative assessment of reproductive potential would assist land managers as to the degree of aggressiveness needed to conserve the species. Accompanying studies would include molecular analysis, pollination biology, seed germination, and seed viability tests.

Kathleen C. Rice
  • 01/01/2010

Seeds need to be collected to augment the seedbank at DBG, since the existence of current plants is precarious.

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Dalea tentaculoides
Authority H.S. Gentry
Family Fabaceae
CPC Number 1356
ITIS 26648
USDA DATE4
Common Names Gentry's Indigobush | Gentry's indigo bush
Associated Scientific Names Dalea tentaculoides
Distribution The species is found in several locations in Santa Cruz and Pima Counties in Arizona (USFWS 1980). Two populations are found on the Tohono O'odam Reservation. Of several sites that were listed on the
State Rank
State State Rank
Arizona S1
Habitat

Dalea tentaculoides grows in canyons, and is found at elevations ranging from 3600-4400 ft., associated with Oak-juniper woodland (Barneby 1977). Because it grows along flood plains along streams, plants are subject to being 'scoured out' by seasonal flooding.

Ecological Relationships

Population numbers fluctuate with the velocity of flow of spring snowmelt runoff (Malusa et al. 1992)..

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Reintroduction
Lead Institution State Reintroduction Type Year of First Outplanting

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