CPC Plant Profile: Shorthook Fishhook Cactus
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Plant Profile

Shorthook Fishhook Cactus (Sclerocactus brevihamatus ssp. tobuschii)

This species produces yellow flowers during the months of February to early April. Photo Credit: San Antonio Botanical Garden
Description
  • Global Rank: T3 - Vulnerable
  • Legal Status: Federally Threatened
  • Family: Cactaceae
  • State: TX
  • Nature Serve ID: 153206
  • Date Inducted in National Collection: 03/08/1989

Tobusch fishhook cactus has attractive yellow flowers which appear in early spring. This beautiful little cactus grows in limestone arroyos in the eastern part of the Edwards Plateau. This is an area that is highly desirable for land development, which is a major threat to the survival of the species. Cacti and succulent collectors have also been cause for the decline in numbers of this plant. The plant is called a "fishhook cactus" due to the hook on the end of one of its spines. (USFWS 1987)

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Updates
  • 09/28/2020
  • Living Collection

Currently, the San Antonio Botanical Garden has several small cacti, which are being maintained in the greenhouse.

  • 09/28/2020
  • Propagation Research

The San Antonio Botanical Garden has recently experimented with seed collected in situ. Seeds were planted in a mix of sand and Sunshine mix, with many germinating and thriving.

  • 09/28/2020
  • Seed Collection

The San Antonio Botanical Garden has recently experimented with seed collected in situ. Seeds were planted in a mix of sand and Sunshine mix, with many germinating and thriving.

Nature Serve Biotics
  • 05/02/2017

Occurs in Texas on the Edwards Plateau, with almost 100 extant occurrences. Most occurrences are small (less than 100 individuals) but overall the species is fairly stable. At least 10 occurrences are being protected and monitored. The primary threat as of 2016 is mortality by parasitic insects.

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Habitat alteration for deer management, livestock trampling, foraging by armadillos, over-collecting, land development.

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Greater than 500 individuals in 33 populations at 4 protected sites (3 state parks + one private)

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

The San Antonio Botanical Garden has recently experimented with seed collected in situ. Seeds were planted in a mix of sand and Sunshine mix, with many germinating and thriving.

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Currently, the San Antonio Botanical Garden has several small cacti, which are being maintained in the greenhouse.

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Study ecological relationships Collect seed from wild populations Manage an ex situ collection and monitor for insect and disease problems

Cindy Barrett
  • 01/01/2010

Send seed to the National Seed Storage Lab.

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Photos
Nomenclature
Taxon Sclerocactus brevihamatus ssp. tobuschii
Authority (W.T. Marshall) N.P. Taylor
Family Cactaceae
CPC Number 126
ITIS 525076
USDA SCBRT
Common Names Tobusch fishhook cactus | shorthook fishhook cactus
Associated Scientific Names Ancistrocactus tobuschii | Sclerocactus brevihamatus ssp. tobuschii | Echinocactus tobuschii | Mammillaria tobuschii | Pediocactus brevihamatus ssp. tobuschii | Sclerocactus scheeri
Distribution Eastern section of Edward's Plateau in Texas (Bandera, Edwards, Kerr, Kimble, Kinney, Real, Uvalde, and Val Verde counties). (Texas Parks and Wildlife 2002)
State Rank
State State Rank
Texas S3
Habitat

Thin clay soils over limestone; seasonally wet, well drained soils; limestone gravel along higher stream banks. Associated plants include oak, sycamore, and Ashe juniper (USFWS 1987)

Ecological Relationships

There is not a lot of information on the ecological relationships of this plant.

Pollinators
Common Name Name in Text Association Type Source InteractionID
Bees
Sweat bees Agapostemon Floral Visitor Link
Honey bees Apix mellifera Confirmed Pollinator Link
Sweat bees Dialictus comulus Confirmed Pollinator Link
Sweat bees Dialictus pruinosiformis Floral Visitor Link
Sweat bees Lasioglossum morrilli Floral Visitor Link
Sweat bees Lasioglossum morrilli Floral Visitor Link
Leaf-cutting bees Osmia subfaciala Floral Visitor Link
Butterflies & Moths
Sulphurs Eurema nicippe Floral Visitor Link
Beetles
Leaf beetles Diabrotica undecimpunctata Floral Visitor Link
Other
Black ant Floral Visitor Link
Reintroduction
Lead Institution State Reintroduction Type Year of First Outplanting
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Texas Reinforcement 2012

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