November 2018 News

Save Plants

CENTER FOR PLANT CONSERVATION

Jeremie Fant, Ph.D., is working with many gardens to maintain a stud book – a guide for breeding these rare plants in a manner which maintains genetic diversity. Here he visits National Tropical Botanic Garden, home of the primary ex situ population. Photo credit: Jeremie Fant, courtesy of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Save Plants

CENTER FOR PLANT CONSERVATION

November 2018 Newsletter

Let’s face it, we live in a technologically-focused world. Most people these days spend more time glued to their smart phones than they do stopping to smell the proverbial roses. While technology has certainly removed us from nature in many ways, it is also critical to the future of saving species on this planet. Today, plant conservationists have embraced technology to Save Plants in ways we never could before. Advances in science, communication and conservation application are all led by our ability to embrace and harness the potential of technology. In this month’s issue of SavePlants, we explore some of these advancements including how we use modern genetics to manage living collections of rare plants, how we communicate conservation needs and values, and how we share cutting edge results on the science of saving plants with other conservationists. By all counts, CPC partners are at the forefront of the interface between technology and plants, and the plants – and our planet – are better for it. Read on to learn how the tree huggers and geeks have come together to Save Plants!

Changing the Approach

Chicago Botanic Garden

Based on contributions from Jeremie Fant, Ph.D.

Growing on a cliff side in Hawaii a lone alula, or cabbage on a stick (Brighamia insignis) is the last natural, wild member of its species. Fortunately, seed from some 15 individuals had been collected decades ago and the species has persisted in ex situ, that is away from its natural environment, in collections at CPC institutions, allowing the species to persist. But that didn’t mean this unique, Hawaiian endemic was in the clear.

Though seeds were collected along maternal lines and the lead institution, National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG), has taken great care to make sure those lines are all represented in each generation they propagate, the main alula collection has shown signs of inbreeding depression (some flower anthers were not developing and hand pollination efforts were not always taking). A genetics study revealed that some of the genetic diversity from the wild had been lost. Preserving the remaining diversity, and maybe even gaining the lost diversity, became a primary goal in maintaining this species. This is where Jeremie Fant, Ph.D., and his molecular ecology lab at Chicago Botanic Garden have been able to help.

Jeremie and his team are drawing on various technologies, from genomics to data sharing, to help take a new approach to maintaining ex situ collections, starting with alula. And the inspiration for the approach came from an unexpected place – the tale of the black-footed ferret.

Once extinct in the wild, U.S. Fish and Wildlife began a breeding program with just 18 ferrets to serve as the founders in the late 1980s. Using assisted reproduction and carefully planned studbooks (a record of pedigrees that informs who should breed with who next) to maintain genetic variability, black-footed ferrets have thrived in captivity and have been successfully reintroduced in the wild. Now there are 18 wild populations, five of them self-sustaining. When Jeremie was thinking about alula and other rare plants with a small number of individuals, he couldn’t help but think of the ferrets and their immense success with such a small number of founders. It dawned on him that careful use of pedigrees could be used to help plant species.

Zoos have been using studbooks for decades to help them maintain ex situ populations and help rare species recover. But the plant world has relied more on maternal lines maintenance – even when hand pollination has been necessary and thus the plant paternity controlled, this hasn’t been recorded. But it could be. And like zoos trading animals or sending sperm to enact the studbooks’ recommendations, botanical gardens could share pollen and help breeding efforts maintain genetic diversity. Having a studbook guide breeding would also help prevent horticultural convenience (i.e., using more seed from the individual that produced the most flowers) from overriding best practices.

B.insignis outplanted in former range at LImahuli Garden

PHOTO: B.insignis outplanted in former range at LImahuli Garden Plants maintained in ex situ collections, such as this cabbage on a stick in Llmahuli Garden, may be key to not only maintaining the species, but working towards recovery. Photo by Seana Walsh, courtesy of the National Tropical Botanic Garden.

Changing the Approach

Chicago Botanic Garden

Based on contributions from Jeremie Fant, Ph.D.

Growing on a cliff side in Hawaii a lone alula, or cabbage on a stick (Brighamia insignis) is the last natural, wild member of its species. Fortunately, seed from some 15 individuals had been collected decades ago and the species has persisted in ex situ, that is away from its natural environment, in collections at CPC institutions, allowing the species to persist. But that didn’t mean this unique, Hawaiian endemic was in the clear.

Though seeds were collected along maternal lines and the lead institution, National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG), has taken great care to make sure those lines are all represented in each generation they propagate, the main alula collection has shown signs of inbreeding depression (some flower anthers were not developing and hand pollination efforts were not always taking). A genetics study revealed that some of the genetic diversity from the wild had been lost. Preserving the remaining diversity, and maybe even gaining the lost diversity, became a primary goal in maintaining this species. This is where Jeremie Fant, Ph.D., and his molecular ecology lab at Chicago Botanic Garden have been able to help.

Jeremie and his team are drawing on various technologies, from genomics to data sharing, to help take a new approach to maintaining ex situ collections, starting with alula. And the inspiration for the approach came from an unexpected place – the tale of the black-footed ferret.

Once extinct in the wild, U.S. Fish and Wildlife began a breeding program with just 18 ferrets to serve as the founders in the late 1980s. Using assisted reproduction and carefully planned studbooks (a record of pedigrees that informs who should breed with who next) to maintain genetic variability, black-footed ferrets have thrived in captivity and have been successfully reintroduced in the wild. Now there are 18 wild populations, five of them self-sustaining. When Jeremie was thinking about alula and other rare plants with a small number of individuals, he couldn’t help but think of the ferrets and their immense success with such a small number of founders. It dawned on him that careful use of pedigrees could be used to help plant species.

Zoos have been using studbooks for decades to help them maintain ex situ populations and help rare species recover. But the plant world has relied more on maternal lines maintenance – even when hand pollination has been necessary and thus the plant paternity controlled, this hasn’t been recorded. But it could be. And like zoos trading animals or sending sperm to enact the studbooks’ recommendations, botanical gardens could share pollen and help breeding efforts maintain genetic diversity. Having a studbook guide breeding would also help prevent horticultural convenience (i.e., using more seed from the individual that produced the most flowers) from overriding best practices.

The alula was a great species to test this approach on because much of the initial genetics work for the species had been done, its seed can’t be stored, and seed from the initial collection had been shared with other institutions. Finding those institutions was an early step for Jeremie. Though each institution maintains excellent records, the information is not always available to others. He was able to use Botanic Gardens Conservation International’s (BGCI, a CPC partnering institution) database to identify plants which originated from that initial wild-collected seed, held at not just NTBG and Chicago Botanical Garden, but also UC Botanic Garden, San Diego Zoo, and even Switzerland. Data sharing is, and will continue to be an important part of this collaborative project.

Advanced genetic technologies will soon be a part of the effort. Jeremie has been working in the lab building the genomic libraries to look at adaptive traits. Many years ago a genetic study using microsatellite markers was conducted with Kayri Havens, Ph.D., at Chicago Botanic Gardens. These techniques focused on neutral traits (those that may or may not be used by the plant) and helped guide the initial studbook and pollen trades. But Jeremie hopes to use more genomic analyses to make sure they are conserving adaptive genes – the parts of the alula’s genome actually being expressed by the plant.

Advancing technologies mean a lot of genetic information can be collected, but how to incorporate that into studbooks, or population management in general, will need to be worked out. Moving forward it would be ideal for the genetic information and breeding history of the plants at each location to be in one place, to better inform the studbook. Sharing more data and information in accessible databases will be key in helping expand this work.

Technology has opened many doors, but how to best use these new tools and information is often another step. Thus far, the studbook approach is getting good results. The alula at several of the BGCI located institutions have genes no longer being carried in the main NGBT population; these gardens have been sharing their pollen and improving breeding output. With such a promising start Jeremie is hoping the studbook approach can help other rare species. He doesn’t have to look far – one third of the relatives of alula known as the Hawaiian lobelioids, have under 50 individuals and unbankable seed. Hopefully studbooks can be used to save more plants and, like the black-footed ferret, become a conservation success story.

BACKGROUND PHOTO: Aborted fruit can be a sign of inbreeding depression. Despite maintaining collections along maternal lines and ensuring all lines carried on into subsequent generations, some of the plants in ex situ collections in Hawaii were showing signs of inbreeding. Photo by Jeremie Fant, courtesy of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Maternal Lines
Plants are, as a rule, promiscuous individuals. Pollen is released in the air or hitches a ride on a pollinator with the hopes of landing on the same species and developing seed. Thus we can’t be sure of paternity (i.e., which plant was the pollen donor) without genetic analyses. Flowers on the same individual, even the same cluster of flowers on that individual could have very different pollen sources, but they will all have the same mother – be from the same maternal line. Tracking maternal lines helps track genetic diversity in ex situ collections.

It takes a village – many gardens and researchers are working together to keep cabbage on a stick around for generations to come. Jeremie Fant and his students Lauren Audi and Jordan Wood visited Seana Walsh at National Tropical Botanic Garden, home of the primary alula population. Photo credit: Jeremie Fant, courtesy of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Hand pollination not only helps promote seed set – even without a natural pollinator – but also allows for control of parentage. Jeremie Fant is organizing gardens with alula to share their pollen and use a studbook to guide which plants should breed with others. Photo by Seana Walsh, courtesy of the National Tropical Botanic Garden.

alula plants

Chicago Botanic Garden cares for several alula plants, descendent from the original wild collected seed as the main ex situ population at National Tropical Botanic Gardens (NTBG). And they aren’t the only ones, with individuals at San Diego Zoo, UC Botanic Garden, and more. Some of these collections have the genetic diversity that has disappeared from NTBG’s population and will be key to interbreeding using the studbook approach.

B.insignis flowers

B.insignis flowers

B.insignis outplanted at Makauwahi cave

B.insignis outplanted at Makauwahi cave
Gardens have been working to save this species for sometime, propagating plants to maintain diversity as well as for outplantings to ensure this special Hawaiian endemic stays in the landscape.

The alula was a great species to test this approach on because much of the initial genetics work for the species had been done, its seed can’t be stored, and seed from the initial collection had been shared with other institutions. Finding those institutions was an early step for Jeremie. Though each institution maintains excellent records, the information is not always available to others. He was able to use Botanic Gardens Conservation International’s (BGCI, a CPC partnering institution) database to identify plants which originated from that initial wild-collected seed, held at not just NTBG and Chicago Botanical Garden, but also UC Botanic Garden, San Diego Zoo, and even Switzerland. Data sharing is, and will continue to be an important part of this collaborative project.

Advanced genetic technologies will soon be a part of the effort. Jeremie has been working in the lab building the genomic libraries to look at adaptive traits. Many years ago a genetic study using microsatellite markers was conducted with Kayri Havens, Ph.D., at Chicago Botanic Gardens. These techniques focused on neutral traits (those that may or may used by the plant) and helped guide the initial studbook and pollen trades. But Jeremie hopes to use more genomic analyses to make sure they are conserving adaptive genes – the parts of the alula’s genome actually being expressed by the plant.

Advancing technologies mean a lot of genetic information can be collected, but how to incorporate that into studbooks, or population management in general, will need to be worked out. Moving forward it would be ideal for the genetic information and breeding history of the plants at each location to be in one place, to better inform the studbook. Sharing more data and information in accessible databases will be key in helping expand this work.

Technology has opened many doors, but how to best use these new tools and information is often another step. Thus far, the studbook approach is getting good results. The alula at several of the BGCI located institutions have genes no longer being carried in the main NGBT population; these gardens have been sharing their pollen and improving breeding output. With such a promising start Jeremie is hoping the studbook approach can help other rare species. He doesn’t have to look far – one third of the relatives of alula known as the Hawaiian lobelioids, have under 50 individuals and unbankable seed. Hopefully studbooks can be used to save more plants and, like the black-footed ferret, become a conservation success story.

B.insignis aborted fruit

Maternal Lines
Plants are, as a rule, promiscuous individuals. Pollen is released in the air or hitches a ride on a pollinator with the hopes of landing on the same species and developing seed. Thus we can’t be sure of paternity (i.e., which plant was the pollen donor) without genetic analyses. Flowers on the same individual, even the same cluster of flowers on that individual could have very different pollen sources, but they will all have the same mother – be from the same maternal line. Tracking maternal lines helps track genetic diversity in ex situ collections.

Tech to Connect

Denver Botanic Gardens

PHOTO: The exterior of the Science Pyramid is partially inspired by the hexagonal pattern of honeycomb, giving homage to the an important pollinator. Advanced architecture and technology are combined in the design of the building.

Based on contributions from Jennifer Ramp Neale, Ph.D.

All photos by Scott Dressel Martin, courtesy of Denver Botanic Gardens

The demanding work of plant conservation often leaves little time or energy to share its importance and impact with the broader community. Detailed data and herbarium vouchers that are vital in documenting species distribution and diversity as well as population trends over time can be tucked away in herbarium cabinets and computers. The amazing story of how a species adds life and color to intermountain steppe habitats is shared only among the handful of people who track these species closely. But technology has allowed Denver Botanic Gardens to more easily go that extra step of sharing their data and telling their plant stories to a wider audience. Through technology, the Gardens are able to connect to both researchers and the public, thereby expanding the reach of their work.

Seeing the Value of Plants

While Colorado plants of conservation concern are incorporated in the living collections with many on display at Denver Botanic Gardens, most of the conservation work happens out of the public eye. Labs, herbaria, and nurseries are tucked away, and field sites are dispersed across Colorado. Creative use of technology at the Gardens not only helps visitors connect with the conservation science its scientists undertake; it also helps them view plants and nature through a scientific lens. Much of this outreach takes place within the Science Pyramid at the Gardens, an impressive piece of architecture that draws on nature for inspiration in its design and pulls visitors in to learn more about Colorado and the steppe environments of the world. In Colorado, these shortgrass prairies and sagebrush valleys are habitat for the rare species studied by the Gardens’ scientists.

The Gardens’ research team prepares to monitor Colorado hookless cactus (Sclerocactus glaucus) in the field near De Beque, Colorado. The data from such excursions are shared in online databases and the public can learn more about this rare plant through the various outreach efforts, including those at the Science Pyramid and on YouTube.

The Gardens’research team takes careful care in monitoring Colorado hookless cactus, a CPC National Collection species.

Within the Science Pyramid, exhibits full of interactive technologies – touchscreens, sound, video, and even a globe – share tales of science and plant exploration. Tall, slim structures reminiscent of an aspen glade, feature digital overviews for visitors showcasing the biodiversity of Colorado, plant adaptations, and the science conducted by Gardens staff. Interactive boulder-like structures provide detailed vignettes of conservation and citizen science efforts to visitors. The integrated touch screens of a large topographic map table not only introduce the visitor to the diversity of ecosystems in Colorado; they also allow the user to explore images of major ecosystems and highlight similar ecosystems in other steppe regions around the world. Bringing the outdoors in, various components of the Science Pyramid exhibits respond to the outdoor temperature and windspeed.

Yet, the public need not visit the Science Pyramid, nor even the Gardens, to learn more about the work being done to save plants. Videos aren’t just for exhibits, but can be found on the Gardens’ YouTube channel. Here, a viewer can be transported to the Colorado steppe as a team monitors the National Collection species Colorado hookless cactus (Sclerocactus glaucus) or to the Gardens’ Chatfield Farms site as they work to restore the creek that runs through it.

These technologies help connect the public to nature. But the tales also empower them to get more involved. Visitors to the Science Pyramid, the YouTube channel, or even the Gardens’ blog, gain an understanding of the breadth and depth of scientific programming at the Gardens. They are also invited to learn about citizen science efforts in which they can participate.

Denver Botanic Gardens is home to an impressive collection of herbaria specimens, but the scientific contained in them isn’t constrained to the herbarium cabinets. The Gardens share their data through online databases, making the information available to the scientific community.

Staff identify herbarium voucher specimens. But the work doesn’t stop with the identification. Herbarium images are photographed and the id and notes are shared in databases.

High resolution imaging of herbarium specimens allows the Gardens’ to share this precious research with the scientific community through iDigBio.

The permanment exhibit within the Science Pyramid is titled “Learning to See” and presented in both English and Spanish. As both the Gardens’ research and technologies change, the Science Pyramid gets updated with new content.

Through touchscreens, sounds, video, and more, the interior of the Science Pyramid brings guests closer to nature through technology.

A boy interacts with one of the many technologies providing an engaging outreach experience at the Science Pyramid during Family Science Day.

Guests don’t just interact with technology at the Science Pyramid, staff and volunteers work in concert with the technologies to share more insight, such as during this science chat at a Science Pyramid Open House.

A group of children enjoy exploring the Science Pyramid during Urban Advantage Family Science Day.

Sharing Valuable Data

Bringing experiences from the field and the lab to others isn’t just a key part of outreach; it is an important part of participating in the scientific community. As such, Denver Botanic Gardens doesn’t collect plants from across Colorado just to keep them locked away in the herbarium. They take advantage of technological advancement, and open access data sharing efforts, to publish the information describing their specimens on various internet databases so that scientists worldwide can incorporate the data into their research and statistical models. What’s more, it’s not just their herbaria data that are shared.

Denver Botanic Gardens has worked hard in the past few years to standardize all of their data collection. This allows them to better combine data from ecological and floristic projects and to expand its use. Data is entered using Darwin Core standards which helps them share data with the broader scientific community in a standardized way. Thus they can share genetic data through the Global Genome Biodiversity Network, specimen data through iDigBio, ecological datasets on GBif, and more. All of their efforts help more scientists work towards increasing our knowledge and understanding of the plant world, hopefully helping us save more plants.

CONSERVATION CHAMPION

Edward Schneider, Ph.D.

President and Executive Director, Botanical Research Institute of Texas

Trustee Edward Schneider Ph.D., currently serves as President and Executive Director of BRIT, but has also served as the director of Santa Barbara Botanic Garden and University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum and ushered those organizations into the CPC network. For his efforts at these three institutions, he was awarded CPC’s Star Award this year.

PHOTO: Dr. Edward Schneider, courtesy of BRIT. BACKGROUND PHOTO: Maurice J Fox.

CONSERVATION CHAMPION

Edward Schneider, Ph.D.

President and Executive Director, Botanical Research Institute of Texas

Trustee Edward Schneider Ph.D., currently serves as President and Executive Director of BRIT, but has also served as the director of Santa Barbara Botanic Garden and University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum and ushered those organizations into the CPC network. For his efforts at these three institutions, he was awarded CPC’s Star Award this year.

PHOTO: Dr. Edward Schneider, courtesy of BRIT. BACKGROUND PHOTO: Maurice J Fox.

Where did you grow up? What is your favorite hometown plant?
I had the privilege of growing up in Cashmere, Washington, small town in the apple and fruit country. This upbringing instilled in me at an early age the economic importance of plants. My favorite hometown plants were the conifers and fir trees that populated the countryside landscapes.

When did you first fall in love with plants?
During my high school years. I had the good fortune during my junior-senior year to be part of a National Science Foundation Grant at the University of Nevada, Reno where I spent a summer doing study and research at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) with Dr. Fritz Went.

What was your path to becoming Director of a botanical garden (i.e., education, career path)?
After completing a doctorate in botany at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), I began an academic career at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, TX. Ascending through the professorial ranks, I eventually was appointed Dean for the College of Science. I found the administrative functions rewarding, including donor prospecting. One day a former mentor at UCSB called and asked if I would consider running the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. The rest is history.

When you aren’t busy saving plants, what do you like to do with your free time?
My wife Sandy and I love to travel, visit gardens and explore natural areas.

When did your garden become a CPC Participating Institution? Do you know – and can you share – the impetus for joining?
Actually, I’ve guided four Gardens into the CPC Participating Institution network: Santa Barbara (1995), University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum (2009), Botanical Research Institute of Texas (2016), and the Fort Worth Botanic Garden (2018). In each garden, geographic location and the need for Plant Conservation were the driving forces for joining CPC.

In your opinion, how has your garden benefited from being a CPC participating institution?
Numerous benefits and rewards come to Participating Institutions: knowing that your efforts help save plants; networking with local, regional and state-wide individuals who share the same concerns for saving plants; participation in the annual CPC meeting with colleague’s from other gardens who are doing the same kind of work; and increased visibility for the garden among community members, donors, and philanthropists.

What aspect of your garden and its work are you most proud of?
If we are still focused on the outcomes for conservation work, I am most proud to have witnessed the capacity of each Participating Institution garden to expand; to see conservation become a growing element of the garden’s mission, and most important to prevent loss of our critically imperiled plants.

What accomplishment are you most proud of achieving as Director of your garden?
Ensuring the financial stability of the Garden and its programs and growing revenue streams that add new resources to existing and new program expansion. Encouraging the professional development of staff to become leaders in their program areas.

What is the biggest challenge you face as Director of your garden?
Providing the resources needed by staff and keeping programs relevant to stakeholders.

What do you think is the single most important thing your garden does to save plants?
Forming collaborative networks and improving channels of communication among all constituents.

What is your favorite National Collection species?
All of them are my favorite (and I especially liked the watercolor images done by Bobby Angel as part of a CPC commission), but if I had to choose one, my favorite is the Minnesota dwarf trout lily (Erythronium propullans).

Why do you think it is important for Garden Directors to be represented on the Board?
Garden Directors have played a critical role, historically, as all PIs were Gardens. With the CPC network expanding, other type of institutional Directors, institutions that are not gardens, but also play a critically important role in conservation, may be asked to join the CPC Board of Directors. Looking forward, the role of Garden Directors needs study and clarification.

What prompted you to agree to become a Trustee for CPC? What unique perspective do you think you bring to the board?

I was asked by the CPC Director to please consider the position, which I gladly accepted. I bring the perspective of successful administration of multiple institution, skills in governance, fundraising, and the building of collaborations.

What excites you the most for CPC moving forward?

Expanding the CPC network and the partnership with San Diego Zoo Global.

During his time at Texas State University, Dr. Schneider led field trips to the Rio Grande region of Texas to study rare and endangered plants, including this 1980 class.

Ed Schneider, Winter I.Q. 93, Summer 94 I.Q.

Erythronium propullans, Minnesota dwarf trout lily.

In August 2018, BRIT celebrated the beginning of construction of their upcoming Molecular Lab. The lab will help establish BRIT as a top-tier plant research and education organization. Executive Director and President Edward Schneider is on the far right.

The first institution that Dr. Schneider brought into the CPC network while he was at the helm was Santa Barbara Botanical Garden in 1995 – the year of this photo.

Water color illustration by Bobby Angel of the endangered Minnesota dwarf trout lily (Erythronium propullans).

In 2006, the Botanical Society of America marked their 100 years as an organization with the creation of the Centennial Award. Both Dr. Edward Schneider and Dr. Peter Raven were presented the award, recognizing outstanding service to the plant sciences and the Society.

Announcements

New release: CPC Best Plant Conservation Practices to Support Species Survival in the Wild!

The Center for Plant Conservation is pleased to announce the publication of CPC Best Plant Conservation Practices to Support Species Survival in the Wild. For more than 30 years, CPC scientists have conducted plant conservation work, making conservation collections, documenting seed germination and storage requirements, learning best horticulture practice for rare plants, adhering to standards to promote genetic diversity, and reintroducing rare plant species to the wild. Our collaboratively generated guidelines are the basis of rigorous plant conservation practice worldwide. For the first time we have consolidated our guidelines to cover plant conservation practice from soup to nuts. We urge practitioners to review the new guidelines that reflect updated knowledge about best scientific practice.

If we are to curb plant extinction, there is an urgent need to involve more people in good conservation practice. CPC wishes to overcome barriers for botanical institutions seeking to expand their conservation programs by providing the most up-to-date methodology needed to engage in important plant conservation work. To facilitate plant conservation practice, we have made our guidelines available as a downloadable pdf. Before the year’s end, look for the web version of the guidelines, which we hope will provide an active channel of communication and learning for emerging and seasoned rare plant curators and can lead to widespread understanding and adoption of best practices, as well as discourse when gaps are identified or changes are needed. Ultimately, we know that preventing plant extinction will require more institutions making high-quality rare plant conservation collections and taking actions to support of species’ survival in the wild.

The Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works

(FAIC) is excited to announce that applications are open for the 2019 Collections Assessment for Preservation (CAP) program from November 1st 2018, with a deadline of February 1, 2019.

The CAP program is open to small and medium-sized museums, zoos, aquariums, arboreta, and botanical gardens in the United States. Participating institutions receive funding for a general conservation assessment from a qualified collections and building assessor. The assessment is a study of all the institution’s collections, buildings, and building systems, as well as its policies and procedures relating to collections care. The two assessors work collaboratively to provide institutions with prioritized recommendations for improved collections care. Assessments consist of preparatory work, a two-day site visit, a written report, and a one-year follow-up consultation. CAP is often a first step for small institutions that wish to improve the condition of their collections or develop a long-range preservation plan, and can serve as a fundraising tool for future collections projects. Additional information on the CAP process, eligibility, and applications are available here. CAP is administered by FAIC under a cooperative agreement with the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

The Catherine H. Beattie Fellowship in Conservation Horticulture

2019 Award – Call for Applications

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

Purpose: To promote conservation of rare and endangered flora in the United States through the programs of the Center for Plant Conservation in partnership with the Garden Club of America.

EVENTS

April 11th – 12th: Bok Tower Gardens, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, and Archbold Biological Station 2019 Rare Plant Task Force meeting and the 2019 Florida Plant Conservation Alliance meeting will be jointly held at the Frances Archbold Hufty Learning Center at Archbold Biological Station.

The annual Rare Plant Task Force is a state-wide meeting to bring together the network of Conservation professionals from a variety of disciplines and agencies to share approaches and findings, forge new partnerships and discuss rare plant conservation priorities. This annual meeting is made possible by grants from the State of Florida, Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry.

The Mission of the Florida Plant Conservation Alliance (FPCA) is to study and preserve Florida’s flora through multi-disciplinary research, education, and advocacy; facilitate the recovery of rare, threatened, and endangered plants of Florida and the southeastern US through collaborative efforts in our state; and communicate the importance of preserving biodiversity worldwide.

Thursday, April 11th will consist of presentations on a main meeting theme of “Planting Seeds: Enhancing Plant Conservation Efforts through Community Outreach and Education,” and will include the 3rd annual FPCA section to discuss safeguarding endangered species in Florida. Friday, April 12th will consist of a variety of half-day field trip adventures to local native habitats.

SAVE THE DATE! and look for a call for papers in upcoming weeks, followed by registration information in early 2019. Updated information will be posted on the conservation pages of Bok Tower Gardens’ website as it becomes available. Please feel free to share this announcement with interested parties.

PHOTO: Erythronium propullans. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

EVENTS

April 11th – 12th: Bok Tower Gardens, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, and Archbold Biological Station 2019 Rare Plant Task Force meeting and the 2019 Florida Plant Conservation Alliance meeting will be jointly held at the Frances Archbold Hufty Learning Center at Archbold Biological Station.

The annual Rare Plant Task Force is a state-wide meeting to bring together the network of Conservation professionals from a variety of disciplines and agencies to share approaches and findings, forge new partnerships and discuss rare plant conservation priorities. This annual meeting is made possible by grants from the State of Florida, Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry.

The Mission of the Florida Plant Conservation Alliance (FPCA) is to study and preserve Florida’s flora through multi-disciplinary research, education, and advocacy; facilitate the recovery of rare, threatened, and endangered plants of Florida and the southeastern US through collaborative efforts in our state; and communicate the importance of preserving biodiversity worldwide.

Thursday, April 11th will consist of presentations on a main meeting theme of “Planting Seeds: Enhancing Plant Conservation Efforts through Community Outreach and Education,” and will include the 3rd annual FPCA section to discuss safeguarding endangered species in Florida. Friday, April 12th will consist of a variety of half-day field trip adventures to local native habitats.

SAVE THE DATE! and look for a call for papers in upcoming weeks, followed by registration information in early 2019. Updated information will be posted on the conservation pages of Bok Tower Gardens’ website as it becomes available. Please feel free to share this announcement with interested parties.

PHOTO: Erythronium propullans. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Employment Opportunities

National Tropical Botanical Garden Director of Science and Conservation:
This position is based at Headquarters, and is being re-opened to applicants from November 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018. The National Tropical Botanical Garden has an opening for a full-time Director of Science and Conservation, to start July 1, 2019. This position is based at the NTBG headquarters in the South Shore Gardens, Kalaheo, Kauai, Hawaii. Application instructions are included in the attached position announcement. More detailed information is available on the NTBG website.

National Tropical Botanical Garden Full Time Horticulture Manager:
This position is based at the South Shore Gardens. Additional information, as well as instructions on applying, are included in the announcement. Please note that this position is open until filled.  More info.

Lindner Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW):
Paid, full-time, five-month internship position available in the Plant Research Division. This internship can start at early as January 2019 but not later than August 2019.  More info.

Chicago Botanic Garden Botanical Outreach and Communication Coordinator:
Position is located at the Washington DC Office of Bureau of Land Management.  More info.

Chicago Botanic Garden Botanical GIS Analyst:
Position is located at the Washington DC Office of Bureau of Land Management.  More info.

Bok Tower Gardens Director of HorticultureMore info.

The Center for Plant Conservation Newsletter
Contributing Editor/Writer – Christa Horn.
Managing Editor – Maureen Wilmot.
Design and Development –  Forest Design LLC.

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By | 2018-11-27T20:09:44+00:00 November 16th, 2018|Featured Article, news|0 Comments

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