Viburnum dentatum var. venosum

Family:
Caprifoliaceae
Common Names:
Southern arrowwood
Author:
(Britt.) Gleason
Synonyms:
Growth Habit:
Tree, Shrub
CPC Number:
8516
Profile Contributors:
Sponsorship:
Fully Sponsored

Reference Links

ITIS - Tropicos - USDA Plants - Fish & WildLife

Participating Institutions

The following Participating Institutions are custodians for this species in the CPC National Collection:
The New York Botanical Garden


The conservation of Viburnum dentatum var. venosum is fully sponsored.

Description

The southern arrowwood is a native shrub that grows from 3 to 9 feet tall. Its leaves are deciduous, opposite, simple, and oval-shaped with coarsely but regularly toothed margins. These shiny green leaves turn yellow to reddish-purple in the late fall. Flowers bloom in May and early June, and are small and white, occurring in 2 to 4-inch flat-topped clusters. From August to November bluish-black berries can be found on the tree. These berries are attractive to wildlife. Because of these qualities, the species Viburnum dentatum is widely-used horticulturally in the central and eastern United States. (USDA 2002a)

Distribution & Occurrence

Pollinators

Protection

Global Rank:
G5T4T5
06/08/1999
Guide to Global Ranks
Federal Status:
11/30/-0001
Guide to Federal Status
Recovery Plan:
No

State / Area Protection

State/Area Rank Status
New York S2 U

Conservation, Ecology & Research

References